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Live Music Local Events

Sunset at the Landing This Friday

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Sunset at the Landing is at the Covington Trailhead this Friday, July 16th from 6 to 9 p.m. This month features Magnetic Ear, Andrew McLean and Steel Mystique. In the event of inclement weather, the show will happen at the pavilion in Bogue Falaya Park.

Sponsored by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market. Bring your chairs and picnic dinners. For more information, call 985-892-1873.

Live Music Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Free Concert This Friday

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https://dnaconnexions.com/last/how-much-do-viagra-sell-for-on-the-street/25/ source essay i love penang que efecto tiene la viagra en las mujeres see go site essay outline rubric here get link https://www.getthereatx.com/capstone/budget-presentation-example/7/ order cialis 10mg tab augmentin generic 875 https://themauimiracle.org/bonus/algestona-acetofenida-enantato-de-estradiol-bula/64/ essay outline examples source link source site bystolic manufacturer coupon how to write an abstract for thesis https://academicminute.org/paraphrasing/oppapers-login/3/ female viagra contents overnight viagra delivery usa https://norfolkspca.com/medservice/is-luvox-a-new-drug/14/ bachelor thesis format latex persuasive essays on legalizing weed can crestor raise liver enzymes see url watch nus phd thesis submission diary of anne frank theme essay essay topics on fifth business cialis genuine buy The Sunset at the Landing Free Concert Series continues this Friday October 16th, 2020 at the Columbia Street Landing (Columbia Street at the river) from 6 – 9 p.m. This month’s concert features Phil Degruy followed by Minos the Saint.

Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Landing Concert Series. Admission is free, the public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets. Social distancing and masks as per governor mandate are required.

For more information call 985-892-1873 or visit the Sunset Concert Series Facebook page.

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Free Concert This Friday

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The Sunset at the Landing Free Concert Series continues this Friday September 18th, 2020 at the Columbia Street Landing (Columbia Street at the River) from 6 – 9 p.m. This month’s concert features Fermin Ceballos from 6 – 7 pm followed by Zac Maras Band.

Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market. Admission is free, the public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets. Social distancing and masks as per governor mandate will be followed.

For more information call 985-892-1873 or visit the Sunset Concert Series Facebook page.

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Free Concert This Friday

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The Sunset at the Landing Free Concert Series continues this Friday August 21st, 2020 at the Columbia Street Landing (Columbia Street at the River) from 6 – 9 p.m. This month’s concert features Jude LeBlanc & Jarrod Nix opening for Big Daddy ‘O’ & Uneven Ground.

Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market. Admission is free, the public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets. Social distancing and masks as per governor mandate will be followed. For more information: 985-892-1873

Sunset Concert Series Facebook page.

Local History

Covington History: Highlights of History by H.A. Mackie

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Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View his blog Tammany Family here.

H. A. Mackie of Covington wrote an interesting overview of the Historical Highlights of St. Tammany Parish, and it was published in the June 26, 1953, edition of the St. Tammany Farmer. It was also reprinted on a handout for the Covington Sesquicentennial.

Here is the text as written by H.A. Mackie.

Highlights of History of Covington and St, Tammany Parish, La.

The SETTLEMENT that was to be called Covington was originally named Wharton, located on the east bank of the Bogue Falaya river, where Claiborne now stands. The old courthouse is still there, re-modeled, as a residence. It was used only a short time as a courthouse.

The development of the settlement was rapid, especially after it was moved to the west bank of the river and the name changed from Wharton to Covington, by an act of the State Legislature, passed March 16, 1816. On April 2, 1832, a charter was granted by the State Legislature to the City of Covington.

Covington was named after a prominent citizen of the time, General Leonard Covington. One story goes that a large amount of whiskey was shipped to New Orleans from Covington, Ky., through Wharton which suggested the name. That is probably, only a fable.

High Land

Columbia Street Landing postcard

St. Tammany parish was the nearest high land to New Orleans and became the gateway to the north and a source of much needed material for building New Orleans, and other products for the city’s development.

New Orleans, being surrounded by water and marshland, the only contact with the rest of the country was by transportation on the Mississippi river and Lake Pontchartrain.

The navigable rivers in St. Tammany parish, offered a desirable means of trading merchandise for raw materials. The Little Tchefuncta, Bogue Falaya and Abita rivers, formed the Big Tchefuncta river about 20 miles from Lake Pontchartrain. The route was directly across the lake to the mouth of the Tchefuncta. Deep water at Covington, made the highland country, with its resources, accessible to New Orleans as far north as the Great Lakes.

The route into New Orleans from the lake was by the new and old canals. Both reached into the heart of the city where the produce, cotton, cattle, hides, wool, timber, charcoal, fuel, wood, naval stores, sand, brick and gravel, supplied the needs of the coming great city, New Orleans.

Tammany Materials Built New Orleans

All of the buildings in New Orleans were made from St. Tammany parish materials. To get some idea of how old Covington is, in 1803 the Louisiana Purchase took place in the Cabildo at Jackson Square. The Cabildo buildings, the St. Louis Cathedral and all surrounding structures had been built of material from St. Tammany parish, years before. The trade and traffic of which, had been handled in and around this location.

Before the saw mills were operated here, the logs from the hills of St. Tammany parish were rolled or dragged to the nearest water courses leading to the rivers, made into huge rafts and floated to the mills on the new and old canals in New Orleans, where they were cut into lumber.

The writer remembers well, the rafts of logs that filled the new canal born Claiborne to Broad street and Martin’s large saw mill at Galvez street. Sand, gravel, wood, charcoal and gravel were hauled in schooners and barges.

At first, mule teams towed the boats to the head of the canals, but later this chore was done by steam tugs. Much cotton found its way to New Orleans from St. Tammany parish.

Brickyards and Charcoal

Old-timers will remember the charcoal schooners at the head of the canals. St. Tammany charcoal and pine wood was the fuel used most in New Orleans in those days. Brick and sand made up much of the tonnage for the boats. The remains of many brick kilns may be found on the rivers in St. Tammany parish today.

After the settlement was moved to its present location, the river front at Columbia Street became the focal point of land and river traffic. Passenger and freight boats made regular trips to New Orleans, some of which were steam driven.

The country north of Covington for 100 miles was covered with virgin yellow pine, some of the finest in the world. It was government owned, but acquired by settlers through homestead rights. A settler could get title to 180 acres by cultivating and living on ten acres for a period of ten years.

Military Road

A main road was established due north through Mississippi into Tennessee, and was used by Gen. Jackson on his way from Tennessee to fight the Battle of New Orleans. He took a boat at Covington and crossed Lake Pontchartrain to get to New Orleans. The road to Covington was called Military Road, because a military post was established on the river north of Covington. It became the artery of traffic to the north, serving the settlers. from St. Tammany parish to Tennessee.

The settlers would take days, sometimes weeks, to drive their ox teams to town to trade their produce with the merchants and buy provisions to last them for months. Many farms were started along the way. Sheep and cattle business developed, lumber and naval stores operations became extensive and large mercantile houses handled a large volume of business.

A branch of the Union Bank of New Orleans was located on Rutland and New Hampshire streets, the old brick foundations are still on the spot. The manager of the bank lived in the then famous Rosedale Mansion on Portsmouth (now Wharton) and New Hampshire streets. This old mansion was burned about 1899, and the present frame structure was built about 1901.

Bank Buries Money

When the Yankee gunboats came up the river to take Covington, the banks money was hidden in a tank buried in the yard of the owner of the bank. The tank was removed in 1915 by the present owner of the property, but no money was found. If there had been any money in the tank, it would have been Confederate and worthless.

The early activities of the settlement started at Columbia street and the river and radiated out into the forests. Foot paths became wagon roads, then highways and now ribbons of concrete to all parts of the country.

The land on the river front was owned by a man named John W. Collins. On March 19, 1814, he dedicated it to the town and laid out the squares, streets and lots. The record reads, “It is humbly dedicated to the late President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, giving use of all streets, alleys, water courses, with timber thereon, as shown by plat, referred to in the body of this dedication.” After the execution of the dedication, Mr. Collins proceeded to sell the lots to interested citizens.

Ox Lots

In the squares, a 20-foot alley was cut through, with an ox lot 120 by 120 feet, in the middle to accommodate the farmers’ teams at night, to keep the oxen off the streets. This dedication by Mr. Collins, was a part of the Division of St. John.

As an illustration of how the town started to develop, the writer has titles and descriptions of property on Portsmouth street (later Independence, now Wharton), between Columbia and New Hampshire, which Includes lots 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15. The following names are recorded, as purchasers of the lots:

Alice Wilson, 1815; Samuel Murphy, 1818; Peter Quinn, 1817; James and Thomas Tate, 1817; John G. Greeves and Laurent Millandon, 1823; James McCoy and Samuel Mallory, 1825; Henry Quinn, 1835; Samuel Davis, 1835; Mrs. Mary Merritt and William Bagley, 1844; William Bagley, 1846; Rev. Victor Jouncourt, 1845 G. Price Durance, 1849; William Bagley, 1850; Mary Ann Dunnica, 1857; Archbishop A. Blanc, 1858; John Ruddock, 1867; Charles R. Bailey, 1868; Rev. Joachim Maneritta, 1870; George Ingram, 1875; Adam Thompson, 1877; Thomas Collins, 1883; James Taylor, 1884; Henry Smith, 1890; St. Peters Church, 1896; Hypolite Laroussini, 1891, H. A. Mackie, 1915.

After the Civil War the railroads came from the north to New Orleans, and commerce and river traffic to and from St. Tammany parish faded. Mercantile houses became country stores, the deep water at the foot of Columbia street filled with sand and only small boats can be accommodated now.

Boll Weevil Obliterates Cotton

The boll weevil took its toll of cotton, the timber played out, the W. P. A. ruined the farmers and with the discontinuance of passenger train service, Covington almost became a ghost town. But with its good climate, timber re-growth, pure artesian water, good drainage, beautiful trees, white sand bathing beaches, Covington has become the place of recreation and health for the people of New Orleans and other parts of the state and nation.

Money Hill Tung Oil Plantation

As business people of New Orleans retired, many established homes and beautiful estates in St. Tammany parish, creating a substantial income for the community. A network of good highways have helped the situation greatly.

Covington and surrounding area have large educational institutions, drawing students from other states and foreign countries.

The new $365,000 parish hospital will add much to the desirability of Covington as a residential city. The tung oil industry and cattle raising, have been developed on a large scale in this area.

Businesses of Covington

A naval stores plant was established in Covington in 1911 and has operated continuously since, with a considerable payroll and benefit in land clearing, pine stumps being the raw material used.

Covington Bank & Trust

There are many very old business places and residences in and around Covington, which would make good reading, if their histories were told. Few cities in America are more interesting and beautiful than Covington.

The parish has other interesting places. Slidell has large and important industries; Madisonville has its shipyards; Abita Springs and Mandeville are famous recreation and health resorts.

St. Tammany parish is a pleasant and healthful place to live in and has a most promising future. It is 68 miles by road and 35 miles by air from New Orleans.

When the Greater New Orleans Expressway is built, St. Tammany parish will be the front yard of the big southern metropolis and its most beautiful residential district.

End of Mackie article

Images of Printed Material:

Click on the images below to make them larger.

Check out Ron Barthet’s blog Tammany Family for more great local history!

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing this Friday

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The Sunset at the Landing Free Concert Series continues this Friday July 17th, 2020 at the Columbia Street Landing (Columbia Street at the River) from 6 – 9 p.m. This month’s concert features Dave Easely, James Singleton and Justin Peake followed by David Bandrowski and John Fohl.

Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market. Admission is free, the public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets. For more information: 985-892-1873

Local Events

This Week in Covington

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Rockin’ the Rails free concert series continues this Thursday with the Cheeseburger Ranchers. Rockin’ the Rails takes place at the Covington Trailhead (419 N. New Hampshire St.) from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. every Thursday in October and April. Rockin’ the Rails is brought to you by the City of Covington and Champagne Beverage. Drinks and food available for purchase at the event. You are welcome to bring your own chairs or blanket, as seating is limited at the trailhead. Covla.com

It’s the last chance to see The Cheeseburger Ranchers for a while at this week’s Rockin’ the Rails Free Concert Series.

Sunset at the Landing takes place this Friday evening at the Columbia Street Landing. This free concert series is brought to you by the City of Covington, the Covington Farmer’s Market, and Heritage Bank of St. Tammany. The concerts take place every third Friday of the month, March through October.


This month features Lulu and the Broadsides with opening performer Phil de Gruy. Lulu and the Broadsides bring sultry blues and New Orleans r&b. Featuring Dana Kurtz on vocals, James Singleton on bass, Robert Mache on guitar, Carl Nuccio on drums and Glenn Hartman on keys. Find out more about Lulu and the Broadsides at danakurtz.com.

Biketoberfest is this Saturday, and Brooks’ Bike Shop is having a Super Bike Sale Sunday through Saturday till October 19, 2019 (Sunday). From Brooks’ Bike Shop:

“Its Back. Our most popular event of the Year. BIKETOBERFEST!
We will be Starting at Old Rail This year for lunch At Noon and ending at The Covington Trailhead where the Oxtoberfest beer fest will be going on. While Biketoberfest is free to attend you will have to purchase your own lunch and beer. Oxtoberfest is $25 i believe with all proceeds going to the boys and girls club. Its sure to be a fun filled day of bikes and beer.”

Tickets for Oxtoberfest can be found @ http://www.oxtoberfest.org/#tickets

The itinerary is as Follows:
12 noon: meet for lunch At Old Rail Brewing co. for lubch
12:45: leave for Chufunkta
1:15: Arrive at Chafunkta
2 pm: Leave for Abita Brewery
2:30 : Arrive at Abita
3:15 : Leave for Oxtoberfest beer fest

For more information, check brooksbikeshop.com or find them on Facebook!

Oxtoberfest takes place this Saturday! This is a Family Friendly Event, all proceeds go to the Covington Unit – Boys and Girls Clubs of Southeast Louisiana.

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Friday

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The Sunset at the Landing Free Concert Series continues this Friday at the Columbia Street Landing (Columbia Street at the River) from 6 – 9 p.m.  This month’s performers include Charlie Miller at 6 p.m. Followed by the Trustys of Davo Crossing.

Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market.  Admission is free, the public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets.  For more information:  985-892-1873

General Local Events Local News

Sunset at the Landing Friday

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Sunset at the Landing takes place Friday, September 21, 2018 from 6 to 9 p.m. At the Columbia Street Landing on the Bogue Falaya River. The Landing Concerts are Free and open to the public, brought to you by the City of Covington, the Covington Farmer’s Market and Heritage Bank of St. Tammany Parish. Bring a friend.

General Local Events Local News

Sunset at the Landing This Friday

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Sunset at the Landing takes place the third Friday of the month, March through October. This free concert series is brought to you by the City of Covington, the Covington Farmer’s Market and Heritage Bank of St. Tammany. Bring a blanket or chairs, food & drink.

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July Sunset at the Landing

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Sunset at the Landing takes place this Friday, July 20, 2018 from 6 – 9 p.m. The concert is free. This month features Olga Wilhelmine and Carl Leblanc.

Sunset at the Landing concerts are brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market.

Local Events Local News

June Sunset at the Landing Friday

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The Sunset at the Landing June 2018 concert takes place this Friday, June 15th at the Columbia Street Landing. This month’s line-up: The Todd Duke Trio and Chris Talley and the Three Rivers Cooperative, 6 – 9 p.m.
Chris Tally and the Three Rivers Cooperative is a local bluesgrass band that many will recognize from the Abita Opry and Marsolan’s Old Feed Store Music Series. The band consists of Christopher D. Talley (Mandolin/ Vocals), Marcia Ferguson (Vocals), Fritz Meyers (Banjo), Daniel William (Guitar/ Vocals), Jefferey Boone (Fiddle), Steve Stewart (Bass) and Charles White (Dobro).
Bring your lawn chairs and picnic dinners. Admission is free, concerts are family friendly & open to the public. For more information, call 985-892-1873.
The Sunset at the Landing concert series is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market. The Covington Farmer’s Market takes place every Wednesday at the Covington Trailhead from 10 a.m. To 2 p.m. And every Saturday at the 600 block of Columbia Street (the front lawn of the Covington Police Department) from 8 a.m. To 12 noon. Live music, fresh produce, prepared foods.

General Local Events Local News Non Profit Spotlight

Sunset at the Landing This Friday

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The first Sunset at the Landing Concert of the season takes

place this Friday, March 16th at the Columbia Street

landing, a free event brought to you by the City of

Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington

Farmer’s Market. Bring a picnic dinner, chairs and blanket

and enjoy music by the river.

Guitarist, singer, composer Cecilia Zabala was born in

Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1975. She is guitarist, singer

and composer. Throughout her career, she has expressed her

musical creativity using her guitar and her voice, creating

original compositions that blend sensitivity, emotion,

technique and intuition. Her music draws on a rich mixture

of influences, from Argentinian folklore, the contemporary

language of the twentieth century, jazz, tango, and

Brazilian music.

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This Week in Downtown Covington

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Sunset at the Landing takes place this Friday evening at Columbia Street Landing. The free concert series is brought to you by the City of Covington, the Covington Farmer’s Market and Heritage Bank of St. Tammany. This month’s concert features Noel Tannen and the Filthy No-No’s followed by the Chris Lenox Group.

Noelle and The Filthy No-Nos are a New York based band whose sound is a synthesis of Soul, Jazz and a touch of Rock and Roll. Noelle Tannen’s eclectic vocal approach defies any single standard, ranging from delightfully innocent to aggressively ragged. In turn, her band meets the demands of such acoustic versatility. Delivering a satisfying oomph of harmonic complexity and rhythmic articulation to support the delivery of a neo-sirens song. Noelle’s current base of operations is New Orleans.

Chris Lenox is a member of Toonces and a solo recording artist on Bubble Bath Records. Previous projects include The Consortium of Genius, Rik Slave and The Phantoms and the Bloomin’ Onions. The Chris Lenox Group is Jon Arceneaux on Drums, Rex Gregory on Keyboards and Sax, Chris Lenox with Guitar and Vocals and Owen Pascual on Bass. Bring a picnic basket down to the landing with a chair or a blanket, or enjoy the many dining options in historic downtown Covington.

Brooks’ Bike Shop and Jolly Roger Paddler’s Club Team up for Pedal Paddle

Pedal Paddle is this Saturday, August 19, 2017. It starts with a fun bike ride to the 4th Avenue Landing. Drop off the bikes and get into the river, paddling back up to Columbia Street Landing. Entry is $10/ person (includes transport for your bike and kayak or board). BBQ at Brooks’ bike shop after. Contact Patrick Brooks for reservations and rentals at 985-237-3658.

Art Association To coordinate August opening with Covington White Linen

Please join the St. Tammany Art Association Saturday, August 19, 2017, for the closing of the 52nd Annual Summer Show and the opening of the August/September Members’ exhibit from 6 to 9 pm. Come early to enjoy a bit of insight from the Summer Show’s award winning artists and Juror Bill Fagaly. Doors open at 5:15 and talks begin at 5:30 pm. Admission is free.

Covington’s White Linen Night is a completely community driven cultural Arts event, created to promote Downtown Covington’s wonderful array of businesses. Beginning this year, all proceeds will benefit the Public Art for Covington Fund, which aims to place meaningful artwork around Downtown Covington for locals and visitors to enjoy. Most area businesses have elected to donate 10% of their sales the evening of the event towards the fund, administered through the non-profit Northshore Community Foundation. This means patrons can come out in their white attire and enjoy everything that historic Downtown Covington has to offer, knowing 10% of every dollar spent will further improve our community and quality of life.

For more information about the event, call the Covington Business Association at 504-439-2543.
For more information about how the Public Art for Covington Fund and the Northshore Community Foundation improve our community and quality of life , call the foundation at 985-893-8757.

More Downtown Covington Events

The Friends of the Library of West St. Tammany Monthly Book Sale Hadden Hall, home to the Friends, holds over 30,000 gently used, donated books sorted into fiction and a wide variety of non-fiction categories such as Cookbooks, Nature, History, Gardening, Biography, Computers, Large Print, Puzzles, etc. and much more. Our media section has vinyl records, CD’s, DVD’s, Audio Books, Large Print, Puzzles, etc. And we have an entire room filled with children’s books! There’s a lot to explore! All proceeds from each sale benefit the Library branches of West St. Tammany. Prices start at $.25 cents!

The Friends of the Library of West St. Tammany is an all volunteer, non-profit organization whose proceeds support the St. Tammany Parish Library. The group holds a monthly book sale on the 3rd Saturday and the preceding Friday of each month from 9:00am – 5:00pm.

Project Homecoming 2017, sponsored by the Junior League of Greater Covington, takes place this Saturday, August 19, 2017, at 529 N. Columbia Street from 9 a.m. To noon. Find Free & Gently Worn homecoming dresses, shoes and accessories for local high school students. Email: jlgcprojectprom@gmail.com for more information.

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Friday, Lagniappe Concert Saturday

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sunset-at-the-landing-102016

Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, the Covington Farmer’s Market and Heritage Bank of St. Tammany.  The concert is open to the public and takes place at the Columbia Street Landing at the river.  Bring a blanket, chair and picnic dinner, or enjoy the many fine restaurants downtown has to offer.  Saturday evening brings Covington a Lagniappe concert for the series (see posters for details.)  Enjoy two evenings of live music at the river!

lagniappe-concert-102016

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing This Friday Evening

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The City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market invite you to a free concert at the Columbia Street Landing this Friday evening.  This month’s Sunset at the Landing features the Pink Magnolias and Crescent Citizen.  Pick up some food from one of the outstanding dining establishments downtown and bring a picnic out to the landing and enjoy some live music.

sunset-at-the-landing-91516-copy

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Takes Place This Friday

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Sunset at the Landing for July features Kukuly and the Gypsy Fuego with The Mockingbirds.  The concert takes place at Columbia Street Landing (Columbia Street at the River) this Friday, July 15, 2016 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  Admission is free, this event is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market.  For more information, call 985-892-1873.

mmw7y7kThe public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and a picnic dinner, and make sure to bring out what you bring in, and dispose of any waste using the proper receptacles.

Downtown Covington has several options for food within three blocks of the landing, including Toad Hollow Café, Del Porto Ristorante, Vazquez Poboy, Buster’s Place, St. John’s Coffeehouse, Wildcrafter, The English Tea Room, New Orleans Food & Spirits and Coffee Rani!

sunset at the landing

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Concert This Friday, June 17, 2016

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June’s Sunset at the Landing Concert takes place this Friday evening, June, 17 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  This month, see the Zac Maras Band followed by Bruce Daigrepont and friends.  Bring your lawn chairs and a bite to eat from one of the outstanding Historic Downtown Covington establishments like Coffee Rani, New Orleans Food & Spirits, Columbia St. Rock N Blues Café, St. John’s Coffeehouse, Vazquez or Toad Hollow Café.  Sunset at the Landing is sponsored by Heritage Bank, the City of Covington and the Covington Farmer’s Market.  For more information, call 985-892-1873.

sunset at the landing 61616