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Quote and Word of the Week

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syn·chro·ny/ˈsiNGkrənē/ synchrony

  1. 1. simultaneous action, development, or occurrence.
    • the state of operating or developing according to the same time scale as something else.”some individuals do not remain in synchrony with the twenty-four-hour day”
  2. 2. synchronic treatment or study.”the structuralist distinction between synchrony and diachrony”

“Make a concerted effort in everything that you pursue or attempt.”
― Steven Redhead, Life Is a Dance

Quote of the Week Word of the Week

Quote and Word of the Week

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Quote of the Week

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”
― Buckminster Fuller

Word of the Week

progress
noun
a movement toward a goal or to a further or higher stage
developmental activity in science, technology, etc., especially with reference to the commercial opportunities created thereby or to the promotion of the material well-being of the public through the goods, techniques, or facilities created.
advancement in general.
growth or development; continuous improvement
verb
to go forward or onward in space or time
to grow or develop, as in complexity, scope, or severity; advance

Quote of the Week Word of the Week

Quote & Word of the Week

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“There’s never been a true war that wasn’t fought between two sets of people who were certain they were in the right. The really dangerous people believe they are doing whatever they are doing solely and only because it is without question the right thing to do. And that is what makes them dangerous.”
― Neil Gaiman, American Gods

Concept of ambitiousness, careerism. A golden egg walks through heads the white eggs.

righteous

adjective

  1. 1. (of a person or conduct) morally right or justifiable; virtuous. “feelings of righteous indignation about pay and conditions”
  2. very good; excellent. “righteous bread pudding”

Quote & Word of the Week Quote of the Week Word of the Week

Quote and Word of the Week

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mind·ful·ness

/ˈmīn(d)f(ə)lnəs/ noun: mindfulness

  1. 1. the quality or state of being conscious or aware of something.”their mindfulness of the wider cinematic tradition”
  2. 2. a mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations, used as a therapeutic technique.

“The most precious gift we can offer others is our presence. When mindfulness embraces those we love, they will bloom like flowers.” – Thich Nhat Hanh.

By Fan Wen – Own work http://www.flowersview.com/Nelumbo-nucifera/Nelumbo-nucifera-3-.jpg.html, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43744673

“Feelings, whether of compassion or irritation, should be welcomed, recognized, and treated on an absolutely equal basis; because both are ourselves. The tangerine I am eating is me. The mustard greens I am planting are me. I plant with all my heart and mind. I clean this teapot with the kind of attention I would have were I giving the baby Buddha or Jesus a bath. Nothing should be treated more carefully than anything else. In mindfulness, compassion, irritation, mustard green plant, and teapot are all sacred.”
― Thich Nhat Hanh, The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation

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Quote and Word of the Week

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“And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”
― Marianne Williamson, A Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of “A Course in Miracles”

liberate

set (someone) free from a situation, especially imprisonment or slavery, in which their liberty is severely restricted.

free (a country, city, or people) from enemy occupation.”twelve months earlier Paris had been liberated”

release (someone) from a state or situation that limits freedom of thought or behavior.”the use of computers can liberate students from the constraints of disabilities”

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Quote and Word of the Week

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“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson

ac·com·plish·ment

/əˈkämpliSHmənt/

  1. something that has been achieved successfully.”the reduction of inflation was a remarkable accomplishment”
  • the successful achievement of a task.”the accomplishment of planned objectives”
  • an activity that a person can do well, typically as a result of study or practice.”long-distance running was another of her accomplishments”
Quote & Word of the Week Quote of the Week Word of the Week

Quote and Word of the Week

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Quote of the Week

“Speak with Integrity. Don’t take anything personal. Don’t make assumptions. Always do your best.”

Don Miguel Ruiz, “The Four Agreements”

Word of the Week

integrity

1 : firm adherence to a code of especially moral or artistic values : incorruptibility

2 : an unimpaired condition : soundness

3 : the quality or state of being complete or undivided : completeness

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Quote and Word of the Week

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“Courage is the most important of all the virtues because without courage, you can’t practice any other virtue consistently.”
― Maya Angelou

resolve noun

Definition of resolve (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : fixity of purpose : resoluteness

2 : something that is resolved

3 : a legal or official determination especially : a formal resolution

Quote of the Week Word of the Week

Quote & Word of the Week

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“Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding.”
― Albert Einstein

peace

1 : a state of tranquility or quiet: such as a : freedom from civil disturbance

Peace and order were finally restored in the town. b : a state of security or order within a community provided for by law or custom a breach of the peace

2 : freedom from disquieting or oppressive thoughts or emotions I have been in perfect peace and contentment— J. H. Newman

3 : harmony in personal relations The sisters are at peace with each other.

4a : a state or period of mutual concord between governments There was a peace of 50 years before war broke out again. b : a pact or agreement to end hostilities between those who have been at war or in a state of enmity offered the possibility of a negotiated peace — New York Times

5 —used interjectionally to ask for silence or calm or as a greeting or farewell

Quote of the Week

Quote of the Week

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“I think it only makes sense to seek out and identify structures of authority, hierarchy, and domination in every aspect of life, and to challenge them; unless a justification for them can be given, they are illegitimate, and should be dismantled, to increase the scope of human freedom.”
Noam Chomsky

Quote of the Week

Quote of the Week

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“The best things in history are accomplished by people who get tired of being shoved around.”
― Robert A. Heinlein, Have Space Suit—Will Travel

Robert Anson Heinlein (/ˈhaɪnlaɪn/;[2][3][4] July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was an American science fiction author, aeronautical engineer, and naval officer. Sometimes called the “dean of science fiction writers”,[5] he was among the first to emphasize scientific accuracy in his fiction, and was thus a pioneer of the subgenre of hard science fiction. His published works, both fiction and non-fiction, express admiration for competence and emphasize the value of critical thinking.[6] His work continues to have an influence on the science-fiction genre, and on modern culture more generally.

Robert A. Heinlein at the 1976 World Science Fiction Convention
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Quote of the Week

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“The world is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.” – Bertrand Russell

Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell OM FRS (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970) was a British polymath, philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, writer, social critic, political activist, and Nobel laureate. Throughout his life, Russell considered himself a liberal, a socialist and a pacifist, although he sometimes suggested that his sceptical nature had led him to feel that he had “never been any of these things, in any profound sense”. Russell was born in Monmouthshire into one of the most prominent aristocratic families in the United Kingdom.

In the early 20th century, Russell led the British “revolt against idealism”. He is considered one of the founders of analytic philosophy along with his predecessor Gottlob Frege, colleague G. E. Moore and protégé Ludwig Wittgenstein. He is widely held to be one of the 20th century’s premier logicians. With A. N. Whitehead he wrote Principia Mathematica, an attempt to create a logical basis for mathematics, the quintessential work of classical logic. His philosophical essay “On Denoting” has been considered a “paradigm of philosophy”. His work has had a considerable influence on mathematics, logic, set theory, linguistics, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science (see type theory and type system) and philosophy, especially the philosophy of language, epistemology and metaphysics. Read more at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertrand_Russell

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Quote of the Week

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“If you want your children to listen, try talking softly to someone else.” – Ann Landers

Ann Landers was a pen name created by Chicago Sun-Times advice columnist Ruth Crowley in 1943 and taken over by Esther Pauline “Eppie” Lederer (July 4, 1918 – June 22, 2002) in 1955. For 56 years, the Ask Ann Landers syndicated advice column was a regular feature in many newspapers across North America. Owing to this popularity, “Ann Landers”, though fictional, became something of a national institution and cultural icon.

The creator of the “Ann Landers” pseudonym was Ruth Crowley, a Chicago nurse who had been writing a child-care column for the Sun since 1941. She chose the pseudonym at random—borrowing the surname ‘Landers’ from a family friend—to prevent confusion between her two columns. Unlike her eventual successor Esther Lederer, Crowley kept her identity as Landers secret, even enjoining her children to help her keep it quiet. Crowley took a three-year break from writing the column from 1948 until 1951. After 1951, she continued the column for the Chicago Sun-Times and in syndication (since 1951) to 26 other newspapers until her death, aged 48, on July 20, 1955. Crowley spent a total of nine years writing advice as “Ann Landers”. She also was featured on the 1953-1955 DuMont Television Network series All About Baby. From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ask_Ann_Landers

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Quote of the Week

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“Never give up on something that you can’t go a day without thinking about.” – Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, DL, FRS, RA (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, statesman, army officer, and writer. He was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, during the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955. Apart from two years between 1922 and 1924, Churchill was a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1900 to 1964 and represented a total of five constituencies. Ideologically an economic liberal and imperialist, he was for most of his career a member of the Conservative Party, as leader from 1940 to 1955. He was a member of the Liberal Party from 1904 to 1924.

Of mixed English and American parentage, Churchill was born in Oxfordshire to a wealthy, aristocratic family. He joined the British Army in 1895 and saw action in British India, the Anglo-Sudan War, and the Second Boer War, gaining fame as a war correspondent and writing books about his campaigns. Elected a Conservative MP in 1900, he defected to the Liberals in 1904. In H. H. Asquith’s Liberal government, Churchill served as President of the Board of Trade and Home Secretary, championing prison reform and workers’ social security. As First Lord of the Admiralty during the First World War, he oversaw the Gallipoli Campaign but, after it proved a disaster, he was demoted to Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. He resigned in November 1915 and joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers on the Western Front for six months. In 1917, he returned to government under David Lloyd George and served successively as Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State for War, Secretary of State for Air, and Secretary of State for the Colonies, overseeing the Anglo-Irish Treaty and British foreign policy in the Middle East. After two years out of Parliament, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Stanley Baldwin’s Conservative government, returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure and depressing the UK economy. From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winston_Churchill

Quote & Word of the Week Quote of the Week

Quote of the Week

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“Stand for something or you will fall for anything. Today’s mighty oak is yesterday’s nut that held its ground.” – Rosa Parks

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an American activist in the civil rights movement best known for her pivotal role in the Montgomery bus boycott. The United States Congress has called her “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement”.

Rosa Parks seated toward the front of the bus, Montgomery, Alabama, 1956. (Photo by Underwood Archives/Getty Images)

On December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, Parks rejected bus driver James F. Blake’s order to vacate a row of four seats in the “colored” section in favor of a white passenger, once the “white” section was filled. Parks wasn’t the first person to resist bus segregation, but the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) believed that she was the best candidate for seeing through a court challenge after her arrest for civil disobedience in violating Alabama segregation laws, and she helped inspire the black community to boycott the Montgomery buses for over a year. The case became bogged down in the state courts, but the federal Montgomery bus lawsuit Browder v. Gayle resulted in a November 1956 decision that bus segregation is unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Read more at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_Parks