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Quote & Word of the Week

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syn·chro·ny/ˈsiNGkrənē/ synchrony

  1. 1. simultaneous action, development, or occurrence.
    • the state of operating or developing according to the same time scale as something else.”some individuals do not remain in synchrony with the twenty-four-hour day”
  2. 2. synchronic treatment or study.”the structuralist distinction between synchrony and diachrony”

“Make a concerted effort in everything that you pursue or attempt.”
― Steven Redhead, Life Is a Dance

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Quote and Word of the Week

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Quote of the Week

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”
― Buckminster Fuller

Word of the Week

progress
noun
a movement toward a goal or to a further or higher stage
developmental activity in science, technology, etc., especially with reference to the commercial opportunities created thereby or to the promotion of the material well-being of the public through the goods, techniques, or facilities created.
advancement in general.
growth or development; continuous improvement
verb
to go forward or onward in space or time
to grow or develop, as in complexity, scope, or severity; advance

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Quote & Word of the Week

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“There’s never been a true war that wasn’t fought between two sets of people who were certain they were in the right. The really dangerous people believe they are doing whatever they are doing solely and only because it is without question the right thing to do. And that is what makes them dangerous.”
― Neil Gaiman, American Gods

Concept of ambitiousness, careerism. A golden egg walks through heads the white eggs.

righteous

adjective

  1. 1. (of a person or conduct) morally right or justifiable; virtuous. “feelings of righteous indignation about pay and conditions”
  2. very good; excellent. “righteous bread pudding”

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mind·ful·ness

/ˈmīn(d)f(ə)lnəs/ noun: mindfulness

  1. 1. the quality or state of being conscious or aware of something.”their mindfulness of the wider cinematic tradition”
  2. 2. a mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations, used as a therapeutic technique.

“The most precious gift we can offer others is our presence. When mindfulness embraces those we love, they will bloom like flowers.” – Thich Nhat Hanh.

By Fan Wen – Own work http://www.flowersview.com/Nelumbo-nucifera/Nelumbo-nucifera-3-.jpg.html, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=43744673

“Feelings, whether of compassion or irritation, should be welcomed, recognized, and treated on an absolutely equal basis; because both are ourselves. The tangerine I am eating is me. The mustard greens I am planting are me. I plant with all my heart and mind. I clean this teapot with the kind of attention I would have were I giving the baby Buddha or Jesus a bath. Nothing should be treated more carefully than anything else. In mindfulness, compassion, irritation, mustard green plant, and teapot are all sacred.”
― Thich Nhat Hanh, The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation

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“And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”
― Marianne Williamson, A Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of “A Course in Miracles”

liberate

set (someone) free from a situation, especially imprisonment or slavery, in which their liberty is severely restricted.

free (a country, city, or people) from enemy occupation.”twelve months earlier Paris had been liberated”

release (someone) from a state or situation that limits freedom of thought or behavior.”the use of computers can liberate students from the constraints of disabilities”

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“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson

ac·com·plish·ment

/əˈkämpliSHmənt/

  1. something that has been achieved successfully.”the reduction of inflation was a remarkable accomplishment”
  • the successful achievement of a task.”the accomplishment of planned objectives”
  • an activity that a person can do well, typically as a result of study or practice.”long-distance running was another of her accomplishments”
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Quote and Word of the Week

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Quote of the Week

“Speak with Integrity. Don’t take anything personal. Don’t make assumptions. Always do your best.”

Don Miguel Ruiz, “The Four Agreements”

Word of the Week

integrity

1 : firm adherence to a code of especially moral or artistic values : incorruptibility

2 : an unimpaired condition : soundness

3 : the quality or state of being complete or undivided : completeness

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“Courage is the most important of all the virtues because without courage, you can’t practice any other virtue consistently.”
― Maya Angelou

resolve noun

Definition of resolve (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : fixity of purpose : resoluteness

2 : something that is resolved

3 : a legal or official determination especially : a formal resolution

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“Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding.”
― Albert Einstein

peace

1 : a state of tranquility or quiet: such as a : freedom from civil disturbance

Peace and order were finally restored in the town. b : a state of security or order within a community provided for by law or custom a breach of the peace

2 : freedom from disquieting or oppressive thoughts or emotions I have been in perfect peace and contentment— J. H. Newman

3 : harmony in personal relations The sisters are at peace with each other.

4a : a state or period of mutual concord between governments There was a peace of 50 years before war broke out again. b : a pact or agreement to end hostilities between those who have been at war or in a state of enmity offered the possibility of a negotiated peace — New York Times

5 —used interjectionally to ask for silence or calm or as a greeting or farewell

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Word of the Week

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love

Definition of love

 (Entry 1 of 2) 1a(1) : strong affection for another arising out of kinship or personal ties maternal love for a child (2) : attraction based on sexual desire : affection and tenderness felt by lovers After all these years, they are still very much in love. (3) : affection based on admiration, benevolence, or common interests love for his old schoolmates b : an assurance of affection give her my love 2 : warm attachment, enthusiasm, or devotion love of the sea 3a : the object of attachment, devotion, or admiration baseball was his first love b(1) : a beloved person : darling —often used as a term of endearment (2) British —used as an informal term of address 4a : unselfish loyal and benevolent (see benevolent sense 1a) concern for the good of another: such as (1) : the fatherly concern of God for humankind (2) : brotherly concern for others b : a person’s adoration of God 5 : a god (such as Cupid or Eros) or personification of love 6 : an amorous episode : love affair 7 : the sexual embrace : copulation 8 : a score of zero (as in tennis) 9 capitalized, Christian Science : god at love : holding one’s opponent scoreless in tennis in love : inspired by affection

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Word of the Week

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interpolation

noun: interpolation; plural noun: interpolations

  1. 1. the insertion of something of a different nature into something else.”the interpolation of songs into the piece”
    • Mathematics is the insertion of an intermediate value or term into a series by estimating or calculating it from surrounding known values.”yields were estimated using linear interpolation”
  2. 2. a remark interjected in a conversation.”as the evening progressed their interpolations became more ridiculous”
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Word of the Week

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indignant

adjective

feeling, characterized by, or expressing strong displeasure at something considered unjust, offensive, insulting, or base

Origin of indignant

First recorded in 1580–90; from Latin indignant- (stem of indignāns, present participle of indignārī “to deem unworthy, take offense”), equivalent to in- + dign-, stem of dignus “worthy” + -ant

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Word of the Week

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an·gel /ˈānjəl/

noun: angel; plural noun: angels; noun: angel investor; plural noun: angel investors; noun: business angel; plural noun: business angels

  1. 1. a spiritual being believed to act as an attendant, agent, or messenger of God, conventionally represented in human form with wings and a long robe.
Messenger Bird by Zack Golden on DeviantArt

2. a person of exemplary conduct or virtue.

Greek angelos Angel derives from the Greek angelos, a translation of a Hebrew word meaning “messenger.”

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Word of the Week

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feel

[ feel ]See synonyms for: feel / feeling / feels / felt on Thesaurus.com


verb (used with object), felt, feel·ing.

to perceive or examine by touch.to have a sensation of (something), other than by sight, hearing, taste, or smell: to feel a toothache.

verb (used without object), felt, feel·ing.

to have perception by touch or by any nerves of sensation other than those of sight, hearing, taste, and smell.to make examination by touch; grope.

noun

a quality of an object that is perceived by feeling or touching: the soft feel of cotton. a sensation of something felt; a vague mental impression or feeling: a feel of winter; a feel of sadness in the air.

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Word of the Week

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circumlocution

noun \ser-kum-loh-KYOO-shun\

1 : the use of an unnecessarily large number of words to express an idea
2 : evasion in speech

Did You Know?

In The King’s English, grammarian H. W. Fowler advised, “Prefer the single word to the circumlocution.” Alas, that good advice was not followed by the framers of circumlocution. They actually used two terms in forming that word for unnecessarily verbose prose or speech. But their choices were apt; circumlocution derives from the Latin circum-, meaning “around,” and locutio, meaning “speech”—so it literally means “roundabout speech.” Since at least the early 16th century, English writers have used circumlocution with disdain, naming a thing to stop, or better yet, to avoid altogether. Charles Dickens even used it to satirize political runarounds in the 1857 novel Little Dorrit with the creation of the fictional Circumlocution Office, a government department that delayed the dissemination of information and just about everything else. From www.merriam-webster.com

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prothalamion

noun \proh-thuh-LAY-mee-un\

: a song in celebration of a marriage

Did You Know?

In 1595, the newly-wed Edmund Spenser wrote a poem to his young bride. He gave this poem the title Epithalamion, borrowing a Greek word for a song or poem in honor of a bride and bridegroom. Epithalamion, which eventually became established as an English word, can be traced to Greek words that mean “upon the bridal chamber.” A year later, Spencer was inspired to write another nuptial poem—this time in celebration of the marriages of the Earl of Worcester’s two daughters. But since the ceremonies had not yet taken place, he did not want to call it an epithalamion. After some reflection, Spencer decided to separate epi- from thalamion and wed the latter with pro- (“before”), inventing a word that would become established in the language with the meaning “a song in celebration of a marriage.” From www.merriam-webster.com

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Word of the Week

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voracious

adjective \vaw-RAY-shus\

1 : having a huge appetite : ravenous

2 : excessively eager : insatiable

Did You Know?

Voracious is one of several English words that derive from the Latin verb vorare, which means “to eat greedily” or “to devour.” Vorare is also an ancestor of devour and of the -ivorous words, which describe the diets of various animals. These include carnivorous (“meat-eating”), herbivorous (“plant-eating”), omnivorous (“feeding on both animals and plants”), frugivorous (“fruit-eating”), graminivorous (“feeding on grass”), and piscivorous (“fish-eating”). From www.merriam-webster.com

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limn

verb \LIM\

1 : to draw or paint on a surface

2 : to outline in clear sharp detail : delineate

3 : describe

Did You Know?

Allow us to shed some light on the history of limn, a word with lustrous origins. Limn traces to the Anglo-French verb aluminer and ultimately to the Latin illuminare, which means “to illuminate.” Its use as an English verb dates from the days of Middle English; at first, limn referred to the action of illuminating (that is, decorating) medieval manuscripts with gold, silver, or brilliant colors. William Shakespeare extended the term to painting in his poem Venus and Adonis: “Look when a painter would surpass the life / In limning out a well-proportioned steed….” From www.merriam-webster.com