Covington Weekly » September 2019

Monthly Archives: September 2019

Quote & Word of the Week

Word and Quote of the Week

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thesis on business information systems enter site essays in world literature https://sdchirogroup.com/savings/leki-na-alergie-skutki-uboczne-viagra/33/ https://www.cuea.edu/cueapress/?paper=free-essays-on-body-image-in-the-media viagra off patent in us side effect of premarin que efectos tiene el viagra en las mujeres ulcers caused by valtrex https://thejeffreyfoundation.org/newsletter/essay-on-chimpanzee-for-kids/17/ 1984 public hanging quotes in essay bactrim to treat uti case study on business life cycle creative writing major miami university best essay books for ias nios source url go site follow site https://hudsonpubliclibrary.org/library/essay-of-national-anthem/92/ cte dissertation chapter 2 thesis qualitative research earth science essay examples ceftin vs zithromax expository essay thesis statement lesson how for cialis to work buy single dose flagyl 1 gram essays and reviews frederick temple essay on mobiles-boon or bane cialis weekend prince how to write characters on macbook pro follow url sacrosanct – (especially of a principle, place, or routine) regarded as too important or valuable to be interfered with.    Late 15th century

“Extremism stifles true progression in all fields of human advancement;  it is a detriment to everything but war, tribalism and the personal power of Nietzschean entities, striving only for the narcissistic vindication of their ego and will.  The enlightened mind knows that all is challengable, ergo questions all and thus, learns and grows;  progression.  The weak and narrow mind makes its beliefs sacrosanct;  fearful of challenge, their creed becomes unalterable, defended with violence.”  –  Daniel S. Fletcher, Jackboot Britain

The New Moon is Friday, September 27, 2019.

Local Events

Farmer’s Market, Downtown Events Saturday

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The Covington Farmer’s Market takes place two times a week:  Wednesdays at the Covington Trailhead (419 N. New Hampshire) and Saturdays at the 600 Block of Columbia Street (Covington Police Department).  The Wednesday market features grab-and-go lunch items, with seating at the trailhead if you prefer to stay and eat.  The Farmer’s Market Players are out on Wednesdays, jamming in the round on the trailhead stage.

The Saturday markets feature live music from local and regional performers, prepared foods and demo, produce, local meats and dairy, plants, herbs and much more.   The Sunset at the Landing concert series, which follows the Block Party schedule of March – October, is sponsored in part by the Covington Farmer’s Market. 

Live Well Northshore, a community health event, takes place this Saturday at the Covington Trailhead (419 N. New Hampshire St.) from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.  This event will feature free cancer screenings as well as a blood drive, blood pressure and glucose checks, food music and more.  Presented by the Mayor’s Council on Healthy Lifestyles.

Kiwanis Club of Greater Covington presents the 2nd Annual Corporate Adult Spelling Bee this Saturday, September 28, 2019 at Covington High School.  Doors open at 5:30 p.m., start time is 6:00 p.m.

Proceeds from the Bee support Kiwanis programs for the children of the Covington Community.  Contact Lynn Delacruz at 985-893-4123 for more information.  Visit the Kiwanis online at kcovington.org.

Keep Covington Beautiful is sponsoring its annual Bogue Falaya River Sweep, a litter cleanup on the Bogue Falaya River, on Saturday, September 28th.

As much as eighty percent of all litter and debris in our oceans, rivers and lakes originates on land, carried there by wind and storm water run-off.  The rivers that define the city of Covington are essential to its unique character.  Join us to help keep our portion of this scenic river clean!

To become a KCB member or volunteer and to learn how to get involved with KCB’s major project, the Blue Swamp Creek Nature Trail, visit keepcovingtonbeautiful.org.  In addition to the nature trail, Keep Covington Beautiful’s other projects include planting the downtown street-side planters, an Arbor Day celebration, educational seminars, litter prevention and recycling activities. 

Local Events

Columbia Street Block Party Friday Evening

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The Columbia Street Block Party takes place this Friday from 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.  Classic cars line the streets and music fills the air.  Stop in to any one of your favorite spots on Columbia for drink specials, food and entertainment.  Hop over to the corner of Boston and Columbia for some coffee and open mic at St. John’s Coffeehouse, featuring Cassie Krebs as this week’s host.  Street Parade perform Wharton’s Green Room for Block Party.  covla.com

STAA Block Party Arts Market:  Stroll through the Arts Market located at Haik Park on Columbia Street, across from H.J. Smith’s, next to Mo’s Art Supply, and find a variety of hand-made arts including:  pottery, jewelry, metal sculpture, stained glass, mixed media, hand-made garments, wood carvings, photography and more!  Find more information at sttammany.art.

A City of Covington Comprehensive Plan Update Public Workshop will take place at the Columbia Street Block party this Friday from 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.  The topic for this Public Workshop is Visioning.  

Representatives will be canvassing between the 200 and 500 blocks of Columbia Street.  Please join the City in creating a vision for the future of Covington.  Light snacks and refreshments will be provided. 

Covington Plan 2030 is a guide for decision-making about growth and development in Covington.  The Plan will outline goals, objectives, and projections of the City’s needs through 2030.  covingtonplan2030.com

Local Events

Services For Mandeville Police Captain Vincent Liberto Friday

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Funeral services will be held at the Castine Center (63350 Pelican Drive, Mandeville, Louisiana) on Friday, September 27, 2019, at 12:00 noon, and is open to the public and news media.

Visitation at the Castine Center will begin at 9:00 a.m., until funeral time. A police procession will follow the funeral services. Interment at the Saint Lazarus of Bethany Memorial Garden (450 Holy Trinity Drive, Covington, Louisiana) will begin after the police procession arrives, with full military honors. The time of the graveside services is extremely tentative, as it is unknown how long the funeral services will last, as well as the police procession.

Statement from the family:  

The family of Captain Vincent N. Liberto Jr. is very appreciative of the enormous outpouring of love and support since Friday, 20 September 2019. There is no doubt that Vince, and so many others, cheered the Saints on to victory yesterday from Heaven! We are requesting that everyone please respect our privacy as we move forward and prepare for this Friday’s Memorial Ceremony to celebrate his honorable life.

Quote & Word of the Week

Words and Quotes of the Week

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wizardry – 1. the art or practice of magic

  1. great skill in a particular area of activity
  2. very impressive technology or devices.

exploit – 1. use a situation for profit 2. to use selfishly to one’s own ends 3. to advance or further through exploitation

“His harmonic words could weave the fabric of time or spin matter from nothingness if the mood suited him.” – Lita Burke


“Manipulation, fueled with good intent, can be a blessing. But when used wickedly, it is the beginning of a magician’s karmic calamity.” – T.F. Hodge

The Last Quarter Moon is Sunday, September 22, 2019.

Opinion

A Hierarchy of Underpaid Wizards

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You’re Suggesting A Hierarchy of Organizations

2019 finishes up the 7th year that the Covington Weekly has been in downtown Covington.  Five of those years were spent understanding how economic development happens on the parish scale.  The first article written on that topic, under the title of CW’s “Economic Development Series,” garnered the attention of Senator Donahue and Larry Rase, who directed the Chamber of Commerce to call and find out what I was up to. 

It did not occur to me to question why the Chamber was calling on behalf of a Senator and a private businessman.

The phone conversation lasted about 45 minutes, during which I was told that the article written presented a “hierarchy” (their terminology) of organizations, to which I wholeheartedly agreed.  That, in fact, was the point.  During the conversation, our tech guy at the time beeped in to tell me that the CW website was being hacked, while I was arguing Civics with the Chamber.

Pay No Attention To The Man Behind the Curtain

Everyone knows and has opinions about the Chamber of Commerce and the Covington Business Association, but what about the Northshore Business Council?  Unless you are a member of the invitation-only business club, you probably don’t know much.  Both Pat Brister, our current Parish President, and Kevin Davis  (previous Parish President) came from the NBC Political Farm Club, so why shouldn’t we know about them?

I remember Trilby L’Enfant, assistant to Pat Brister circa 2014, presenting information at a Covington Business Association meeting regarding…. economic development. I waited until the end of the presentation, but I had some specific questions about the open-ended documentation and lack of publicly accessible information regarding the revenue bonds that the St. Tammany Economic Development Foundation (a problematic agency that no longer exists) was fond of tasking their Super Lawyers with writing.  I was pulled aside by the CBA president, who addressed the fairness of my question.  

“It’s regarding economic development,”  I said.  

“Fair enough,” he replied.  

What he meant was, she didn’t have permission from the man behind the curtain to answer my question.

 “What we do up here, we don’t get paid enough”

These words, in whatever context, came out of the mouth of Parish Council member Rykert Toledano, who was married to the president of the St. Tammany West Chamber of Commerce at the time.  After watching the nine- second clip from a council meeting on the Concerned Citizens of St. Tammany Facebook page, what he could be saying is how difficult it is for the members of the Parish Council to do what the public is asking of them, because of the little amount of money the council members receive compared to the time that is put in listening to the public and stuff.  Or maybe he was saying that he doesn’t get paid enough to do what the public wants as opposed to what developers want, which seems to be the case since his record indicates favoritism to developers.  

I think that what Rykert wants is not to be questioned;  unfortunately, public office is not the place one should go to escape accountability.  Covington Weekly has shown through the years that the parish council gets their house and senate picks to write bills that allow them to do things like exempt themselves from state ethics laws in order for their insiders to serve on multiple boards of conflicting government agencies, all while presenting a shining Chamber of Commerce endorsement.

 “I know it feels like, somebody’s watching me…”

I very much dislike politics.  Like disconnected childhood traumas, election cycles can inflict quiet wounds, just for being in the wrong place at the wrong time.  Last sheriff’s race, for example, there was an individual assigned to me for the simple reason that I omitted Strain’s name from any coverage because I already knew some things and did not think he was relevant.  Turns out he wasn’t.

Since then, that same individual was arrested for cyber-stalking, confirming my assessment of the time that they appeared in my life.  It also exemplifies the lengths that politicians will go to to exert their will onto others. 

I dislike lies and intimidation more than I dislike politics, and I will deal with politics in order to confront some lies and intimidation, even more so if it is coming from the publicly elected but privately selected.  I can agree on one thing:  I don’t get paid enough either.  Such is the way of the Hierarchy of Underpaid Wizards.

Timothy Achan Gates, CW Correspondent –  opinion

Shop Local

Goodbee Plumbing: Residential & Commercial

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As a family-owned and locally operated plumbing company in Covington, Goodbee Plumbing Inc. provides fast and reliable service to residential and commercial property owners throughout Pontchatoula, St. Tammany Parish, Hammond, and the surrounding areas. Local plumbers have so much more to offer when your drains need a thorough cleaning, you have remodeling needs, your sewers get backed up, or you’re stung with other plumbing headaches hard to get rid of on your own.

Have a plumbing question? Not sure if you need to call in the experts to help with your plumbing problem? Goodbee Plumbing is here to help!  Browse our plumbing tips & frequently asked questions for answers to some of the most common plumbing questions online at our website:  goodbeeplumbinganddrains.com

Don’t see your question listed? Need help with a specific plumbing problem? Call  today (985) 999-1297 !

General

Things To Do In Downtown Covington

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You don’t have to look very far to find something to do in Covington’s St. John Historic District.  For a self-guided walking tour, just stroll down Columbia Street and New Hampshire Streets and look for the kiosks that show an historical perspective from the point where you are.

The Covington Trailhead is also home to the Trailhead Museum, where you can find more historical information about Covington, as well as a locally-produced short film.

The Covington Trailhead and Museum is located at 419 N. New Hampshire Street.

The Tammany Trace runs right through the trailhead, a biking trail converted from the old railroad line that ran through Covington.  Brooks’ Bike Shop is located on the Tammany Trace, across from the Covington Trailhead.  Brooks’ Bike Shop features convenient online rentals, as well as repairs and sales of new and used bicycles and accessories.  Brooks’ also rents kayaks and is your stop for outdoor recreation in downtown Covington.

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Friday

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The Sunset at the Landing Free Concert Series continues this Friday at the Columbia Street Landing (Columbia Street at the River) from 6 – 9 p.m.  This month’s performers include Charlie Miller at 6 p.m. Followed by the Trustys of Davo Crossing.

Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market.  Admission is free, the public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets.  For more information:  985-892-1873

Quote & Word of the Week

Word and Quote of the Week

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Word of the Week

clarify – 1. to make (an idea, statement, etc.) clear or intelligible; to free from ambiguity. 2. to remove solid matter from (a liquid); to make into a clear or pellucid liquid. 3. to free (the mind, intelligence, etc.) from confusion; revive. 4. to become clear, pure, or intelligible:

Quote of the Week

“If you have feelings for someone, let them know. It doesn’t matter if they can be in your life or not. Maybe, it is just enough for both of you to release the truth, so healing can occur. The opposite is true, as well. If you don’t have feelings for someone then never let another person suggest that you do. Protect your reputation and be responsible for the wrong information spread about you. Never allow anyone to live with a false belief or unfounded hope about you. An honorable person sets the record straight, so that person can move on with their life.”  –  Shannon L. Alder

The Full Moon is Friday, September 13, 2019.

Local News

Leadership St. Tammany Class of 2020

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Mandeville, LA – Leadership St. Tammany (LST) introduced the members of its Class of 2020 at a reception and ceremony on Wednesday, July 24, at The Greystone Venue in Mandeville.

The event recognized the most recent St. Tammany Parish residents selected to take part in LST, a 10-month program that offers participants an in-depth look into the inner workings of government, business, civic and cultural organizations in St. Tammany. 

Those chosen for the program this year are representative of diverse backgrounds, professions, ages, accomplishments and length of residency in St. Tammany, and were joined by family members, friends, LST alumni and local dignitaries as they were introduced. The 35 members of the Class of 2020 are Joanna Anderson, Lisbeth “Libby” Andriessen, Owen Birkett, Lieu Vo Clark, Joan Coffman, Stephen Culotta, Michelle Mayne Davis, Richard “Ricky” Galloway, Ashleigh Garner, Mandy Gerrets, Jay Grave, Matthew Greene, Maureen Greer, Kaycee Hopkins, Alvin Hotard, Paul Jones, Richard Kramer, David LeBreton, Meredith Mendez, Nick Mills, Kevin Morgan, Alisha Neal, Amanda Phillips, Derek Rousseau, Daina Short, Corey Steele, Brian Swindell, Jennifer Trosclair, Amy Tucker, Ben Vliet, Michelle Warshauer, Stanley “Skip” Weber III, Jeffrey Wilke, Timothy Wolfe and Keitisha Young.

Jennifer Messina, who this year begins her tenure as chairperson of the LST Board of Trustees, welcomed the group, including Pastor Eddie Swan, LST Class of 2015, who led those assembled in prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance. Messina then introduced each member of the new class, sharing a short biography on each. 

“The number and quality of Leadership St. Tammany program applicants is impressive each and every year,” said Camilla Davis, former LST Board of Trustees chairperson and newly-minted program director. “It is extremely difficult to narrow the pool down to 35. That said, we are thrilled with the diverse and talented group of current and future leaders in our Class of 2020.”

Covington Mayor Mark Johnson, longtime LST program director, will lead the classes alongside Davis. The two plan each monthly class, select speakers and locations, prepare presentations and facilitate the classes.

“We work to ensure that each class is educational and thought provoking, and we strive to include a bit of fun,” Johnson said. “We are so happy to welcome this new class and are looking forward to a fantastic year of conversations and collaborations that will most certainly enhance our beloved community.” 

Local Events

City of Covington Announces Music in the Park

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Mayor Mark R. Johnson invites the public to attend Music in the Park on Thursday, September 26 from 6:00 pm until 8:00 pm at the Reverend Peter S. Atkins Park, 701 N. Tyler Street, Covington, LA. Bring a lawn chair or blanket to enjoy music by the Mighty Supremes. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. No pets will be allowed. 

Beginning at 6:00 pm, the City of Covington will host an unveiling and dedication of the new park sign honoring Reverend Peter S. Atkins. 

“Reverend Atkins was such an important part of our city on so many levels. I look forward to sharing just a wee bit of his message with the community as well as kicking back with the Mighty Supremes,” said Mayor Mark. 

The Mighty Supremes are a Covington, Louisiana based Gospel band who have performed locally at the Abita Springs Opry and the Trailhead in Abita Springs.  Food and beverages will be available for purchase at this event.  Bring your own chairs and blankets, No Pets Allowed.

Local Events

Rockin’ the Rails October 2019 Lineup Announced

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The city of Covington is excited to announce its Rockin’ the Rails Free concert series at the Covington Trailhead, 419 N. New Hampshire Street.  The concerts will take place every Thursday in October from 5 pm to 7:30 p.m.  The series is sponsored by Champagne Beverage and is presented by the City of Covington Office of Cultural Arts & Events.  This October’s line up promises to be another great success!

October 3 – Tuba Skinny  October 10 – Where Y’acht  October 17 – Cheeseburger Ranchers   October 24 – New Suit   October 31 – Lost in the 60’s


Covington’s own Cheeseburger Ranchers play Rockin’ the Rails on Thursday, October 17 at the Trailhead.

“Come enjoy a free concert and wind down with refreshments available through local non-profits and support our sponsor so that these events may continue to be free and open to the public,”  says Cultural Arts and Events Director Aimee Faucheaux.  Attendees may wish to bring their own chairs or a picnic blanket as there is limited seating provided at the Trailhead.  Beer and wine will be available for purchase during the concert. 

The City of Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts and Entertainment is located at the Covington Trailhead (419 N. New Hampshire St.), along with the Trailhead Museum.  To join the City of Covington’s email list and receive announcements and reminders regarding upcoming events, email gottaluvcov@covla.com.

Local News

CFD Firefighter Deploys for 2nd Afghanistan Tour

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The Covington Fire Department announced the deployment of Firefighter/Operator Sgt. George Frost who serves in the United States Army as a Combat Flight Medic. This is his second tour to Afghanistan. 

Sgt. Frost is pictured below with his family, and the Covington Fire Department thanks Sgt. Frost, along with the many others deployed who leave their families and make the sacrifice to serve our country.

Firefighter/Operator George Frost was a certified EMT with Covington Fire Department, and with hard work and dedication, he recently received his Paramedic certification.   Stay safe and come home!

Local News

Brooks’ Bike Shop Making Bike Racks

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Brooks Bike Shop is busy making bike racks!  You can find the one on top at the Lion’s Den Salon, and the one below is in front of Mo’s Art Supply.  If you take a picture parking your bike at one of Brooks’ bike racks, snap a picture and send it to Covington Weekly!

Brooks Bike Shop is located at 416 Gibson Street on the St. Tammany Trace.  Call 985-237-3658 and find them on Facebook.  brooksbikeshop.com

Local News

Mayor Mark Johnson: Slow Your Roll

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The City of Covington introduced a new mantra for drivers, “Slow Your Roll”, at a recent CBA meeting.  Mayor Johnson reminded drivers that they will be gently asked to drive slower, then firmly reminded throughout October.  In November, there will be consequences for driving fast, so “slow your roll”!

Pictured from Left to Right: Executive Assistant to the Mayor Bridget Watson, Office of Cultural Arts and Events Coordinator Zac Cuny, Covington City Councilperson Cody Driskell Ludwig and Covington City Councilperson Mark Verret.

Quote & Word of the Week

Word and Quote of the Week

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Word of the Week

trumpery – 1. attractive articles of little value or use 2. practices or beliefs that are superficially or visually appealing but have little real value or worth 3. showy but worthless 4. delusive or shallow origin: late Middle English (denoting trickery): from Old French tromperie (deceive)

prevarication – 1. the deliberate act of deviating from the truth 2. a statement that deviates from or perverts the truth 3. intentional vagueness or ambiguity

Quote of the Week

“Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain!” – Noel Langley, The Wizard of Oz

The First Quarter Moon is Thursday, September 5, 2019.

Non Profit Spotlight

NHS Pet of the Week

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Meet Asa. He’s a 5 year old male who was rescued during Operation Furever Safe, along with 39 other dogs. Having only 3 legs doesn’t slow him down a bit! He’s both dog and kid friendly, potty trained and loves belly rubs! His favorite place to be is laying at your feet and just wants to be touching you. He is currently in a wonderful foster home with new friends, but is still looking for his perfect forever home. 

Visit the Northshore Humane Society to meet any of the pets looking for loving homes. NHS is located at 20384 Harrison Ave. 985-705-7589
Visit online at northshorehumane.org

Opinion

Broken Trust by Nick Tranchina

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Trust in public office is a hard thing to come by. It takes hard work to foster and build on trust and only a moment to destroy it. The recent indictment announcement regarding Mr. Strain has me thinking more about the future of St. Tammany Parish more now than ever. Mr. Strain’s alleged behavior is a breach of public trust and he is now in the hands of the criminal justice system. The process has started and he will be judged by his peers as a result and a verdict eventually handed down.
However, my attention is on the future of the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office and how we are viewed currently. We as a community want to trust our leaders and believe they have our best interest in mind and will do the right thing when no one is looking. That is really a simple expectation and not far fetched – Right?
I was excited to see change come to the Sheriff’s Office in 2016 and had an expectation that the new administration would bleed integrity and trust. No one more than me wanted to see that positive change so we could watch our law enforcement community grow back in touch with our citizens.
I quickly learned that applying my individual expectations to someone else’s moral compass was a mistake and led me to disappointment.
Since I’ve been on the campaign trail my message to people has been one of rebuilding trust. Rebuilding trust through transparency, honesty, and accountability. Unfortunately we quickly find that a politician’s goals are often in direct opposition of that message and are primarily interested in political office for selfish or short-sighted reasons.
I’m sure some will say, wait Nick you’re a politician now – All I can say is God I hope not now or ever. However, I do want to be a great representative for my community – I certainly hope that doesn’t make me a bad fit for the job. Needless to say, if your character is weak, then your weaknesses will eventually show.
Over the last 10 to 12 years our failures in local government have been character failures and not necessarily competence failures. Pay attention to what is happening around you because the future of our community will depend on it.

Nick Tranchina, candidate for St. Tammany Parish Sheriff

Local Events

Cancelled Edition: The Art of Birding

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St. Tammany Art Association presents “Canceled Edition: The Art of Birding”, a new exhibition featuring the work of artist Pippin Frisbie-Calder.
Artist Pippin Frisbie-Calder calls attention to the connection of humans to the rapidly increasing list of endangered species through the equally endangered art form of printmaking.

Based in New Orleans, Frisbie-Calder works passionately as a printmaker. She devotes thousands of hours to her skill and process utilizing screen print and woodcut practices of hand cutting and painting prints.
Installations from her “Canceled Edition” series not only transform spaces, but also are interactive. The interactivity connects people to the work and highlights the natural human behavior of the desire to preserve and enjoy something while conversely extinguishing it in the process. “Canceled Edition: The Art of Birding” will include an installation of over 300 hand-drawn and screen printed birds of twelve species that are endangered here in Louisiana. These include the Monk Parakeet, the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird, and the Scarlet Tanager often spotted in many parks and gardens around our state. The visual impact is strong as viewers participate in the installation by removing birds from the wall one-by-one for the duration of the exhibition. Through her work, Frisbie-Calder presents Environmentalism in a new light. She encourages people, in her own words, “to revel in the beauty of the world, to understand what we currently have, and to gain a sense of stewardship for natural spaces.”
In addition to the installation of endangered species, “Canceled Edition: The Art of Birding” will showcase Frisbie-Calder’s larger-scaled woodblock prints. These pieces simultaneously explore the different processes of woodblock printing and cultural themes that connect the peoples of Louisiana.
St. Tammany Art Association (STAA) will open the exhibition to the public on Saturday, September 7, and host an opening reception on Saturday, September 14, 2019 from 6:00 – 9:00 pm. The exhibit will be on display through September 28, 2019 in our main Miriam Barranger Gallery. A gallery talk with the artist will take place on Saturday, September 14, 2019 from 4:00 – 5:00 pm before the opening reception. STAA will also host an Ornithological Panel Discussion on Saturday, September 21 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm with Pippin Frisbie-Calder joined by biologists and professors, Dr. Jennifer Coulson, and Dr. Donata Henry.
Frisbie-Calder’s experience with printmaking is vast and broad. She received a BFA with honors in printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA in printmaking from Tulane University. She also studied large-scale woodcuts abroad in Indonesia. Frisbie-Calder has taken residencies in Providence, Rhode Island; Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida; as well as a residency and teaching position in Haiti. She has exhibited extensively including a solo show at the Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans; a large installation and video projection at the Urban Institute of Contemporary Art in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She has had work exhibited at numerous galleries in New Orleans, LA; Denver, Colorado; Providence, Rhode Island; and Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
The St. Tammany Art Association is located at 320 N. Columbia Street, Covington, LA 70433. Our gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 am – 4 pm and Saturday 11 am – 4 pm. All exhibitions are free and open to the public unless otherwise indicated.
STAA is supported by the generosity of our 2018 Season of the Arts sponsors and by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council, as administered by the St. Tammany Parish Commission on Cultural Affairs. Funding has also been provided by the National Endowment for the Arts, Art Works.

Stroll through STAA’s Arts Market and find a variety of hand-made arts including: pottery, jewelry, metal sculpture, stained glass, mixed media, hand-made garments, wood carvings, photography and more! The Arts Market provides entrepreneurial opportunities to artists while fostering creative community relationships by allowing the artists to sell directly to the public.
STAA’s Arts Market takes place on the first Saturday of every month at the Covington Trailhead.
The Art Market at the Trailhead is an open air market held on the first Saturday of each month located at 419 N. New Hampshire Street from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.