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Non Profit Spotlight

Give the Gift of Hope – Donate to Children’s Advocacy Center Hope House

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From Children’s Advocacy Center – Hope House Executive Director https://sfiec.edu/pdf/?docx=a-good-thesis-statement-for-a-book-review homework help math 5th grade sildenafil mezclado con licor efecto secundario de la levitra machiavelli prince essay https://shilohchristian.org/buy/3-elements-of-face-to-communication-essay/54/ https://tffa.org/businessplan/being-a-nurse-essay/70/ here click essay on one step for conservation of environment https://robsonranchviews.com/article/how-to-write-a-descriptive-essay-about-my-best-friend/4/ methyl prednisone animal click political crisis in pakistan essay commande de viagra en ligne source url https://dianegottlieb.com/education/bebe-3-mois-essaye-de-se-redresser/93/ how do i burn a music cd on my macbook pro https://thejeffreyfoundation.org/newsletter/food-photo-essay/17/ dissertation chapter 3 guidelines fetal alcohol syndrome research paper https://energy-analytics-institute.org/freefeatures/argumentative-essay-topics-2012-nfl/56/ go here https://norfolkspca.com/medservice/cube-modle-crestor/14/ child speech development follow site thesis on diversity in the workplace viagra online generic fast delivery source site calculos renales y viagra alprazolam thailand essay on digital india week Thomas Mitchell:

Dear Friend of Hope House,

This year has presented new challenges for us all, but probably none so much as the child abuse victims we serve at Hope House. Most of these children have experienced unfathomable sexual abuse, physical abuse, trafficking, or extreme neglect. The COVID-19 crisis has only amplified our national and local child abuse epidemic. As a united community, we can heal those emotional wounds, get justice for children, and restore faith in families, communities, and institutions.

That’s why I’m writing to ask you to support our shared mission with a tax-deductible, year-end gift.

So far in 2020, Hope House has served nearly 350 child abuse victims right here in St. Tammany and Washington Parishes. That’s more children than any preceding year in our organization’s 26-year history. As you already know, we provide:

  • Forensic interviews, which help local law enforcement bring child abusers to justice
  • Ongoing trauma-focused therapy and advocacy for victims and their non-offending caregivers
  • And abuse prevention education to adults and children throughout our community.

Thanks to the generosity of people like you, we have been able to provide all of these services free of charge, making the Northshore a safer place for children and families. Here’s a glimpse at the real-world impact of your investment:

  • $2,000 covers the cost of a forensic interview, and comprehensive care and services for one child abuse survivor.
  • $1,000 covers the cost of a child’s entire therapy journey following abuse and trauma.
  • $250 covers training to a group of 20 adults to better protect children through our Stewards of Children abuse prevention program.
  • $50 covers the cost of a specialized counseling session for a child abuse survivor.

If you believe, as we do, that the foundation of a strong community starts with the health and wellbeing of our children, please consider making an end-of-year, tax-deductible donation to Children’s Advocacy Center – Hope House. Or take your commitment one step further and become a community partner. Your donation is critical to ending the cycle of child abuse.

Please visit CAChopehouse.org or contact me directly to your donation or learn more about how you can provide hope, healing and justice to our community’s most vulnerable children.

Merry Christmas, and God bless you and your family.

Thomas Mitchell, LPC, NCC
Executive Director
985-892-3885 Ext. 3
thomas@cachopehouse.org

Give Hope! Donate Today!

General Opinion

Human Trafficking in the United States

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According to the U.S. Justice Department, 14,500 to 17,500 people are trafficked into the country every year. The 2016 Global Slavery Index estimates that 57,700 U.S. Citizens and immigrants are victims of human trafficking, including young children, teenagers, men and women.
At the same time, recent analysis by the Bureau of Justice Statistics showed a gap between the claimed number of victims and confirmed cases of victimization. How is this discrepancy characterized? Are people sensationalizing their experiences, or is the system hindered in some way? In many cases, sex workers refuse to report crimes because they themselves will be arrested as active participants in criminal behavior.
This brings to mind statements made by New Orleans D.A. Leon Cannizarro in April of this year regarding victims of rape and domestic violence. In effect, victims would be forced to testify with material witness warrants or face jail time. Not only is jailing a victim of that nature of crime abusive, it is counterproductive to the goal of removing violent criminals from the street.
It is a crime to make people work by use of force, coercion or fear under federal law; by extension, no one should be forced to testify under duress. Our very own Declaration of Independence was influenced in part by the philosophy of natural law, which was instrumental in challenging the divine right of kings, and is distinct from common law.
Simply, it is the idea that all human beings on the planet ultimately have the same rights, which are not to be violated by the state or by one another.

That seems pretty idealistic, but the ancient Greeks, who influenced some of the better aspects of our current social knowledge, thought it was fairly legitimate. The responsibility evident in the concept of natural law is that taking care of oneself is essential to having the ability to help others. This self determination also implies the right to be free of negative influence, in whatever fashion.
The basis of natural law is such that a person or entity does not have the right to impose their will on another individual. Although it seems that we have moved far away from that ideal, it is always obtainable. It begins simply with how we treat one another, exhibiting a basic respect for life, and placing people over profits.
Fear should never be a factor in disclosing abuse, and neither should ignorance. The real problem with the discrepancy of the numbers is that it implies one of two things: 1) people are making up stories or 2) the nature of the issue is more institutional than recognized. Send comments or responses to covweekly@gmail.com