Covington Weekly » Blog Archives

Tag Archives: Bogue Falaya Park

Live Music Local Events

Sparks in the Park This Saturday

Published by:

Mark your calendars for the City of Covington’s annual Sparks in the Park on Saturday, July 3, 2021. This wonderful family event will celebrate America’s Day of Independence and will begin at 4:30 pm in Bogue Falaya Park, 213 Park Drive in downtown Covington. Attendees will enjoy patriotic music followed by an exciting fireworks display beginning at dusk (approximately 8:50 pm) presented by the City of Covington.

The show will be a fun, family event for the whole community. “With so many new elements added to this year’s event, it is sure to be an unforgettable celebration,” says Bridget Hatty, Cultural Arts and Events Coordinator for the City of Covington.

The City of Covington continues to host the “Hot Dog Eating Challenge” at 6:00 pm sponsored by Covington Business Association. At 6:30 pm, there will be a watermelon eating contest for the kids. Both contests are FREE to enter, and signup is at the beginning of each contest.

New to this event is the Covington Concert Band consisting of approximately 60 musicians. They will perform from
7 to 9 pm, including the last ten minutes of the fireworks show. This band is a community organization sponsored by the City of Covington and is comprised of local musicians from all corners of Southeastern Louisiana. Prior to Community Concert Band performing, we have two additional music stages called the Lacroix and Frederick Stages. Performing on the Lacroix stage at 5 pm will be the Dishonorable Johnsons, and at 6 pm will be Extraordinary Sessions; on the Frederick Stage, the Northshore Traditional Music Society from 5 to 7 pm.

There will be FREE face painting for the kids. Concessions will be available for purchase from the Kiwanians and, additionally, there will be a nice array of food trucks. Attendees are welcomed to bring their own chairs and picnic. This event is FREE and open to the public.

Please note that the kayak launch will be closed that day, and no golf carts will be allowed in the park.

For more information, contact:
Bridget Hatty
City of Covington, Office of Cultural Arts & Events
985-892-1873, bhatty@covla.com, or visit covla.com

Local Events Local News Non Profit Spotlight

7th Annual Quack A Falaya Saturday

Published by:

Covington Rotary Club presents the 7th Annual Quack-A-Falaya this Saturday, June 26, 2021. The Rubber Duck Race Fundraiser benefits the Boys and Girls Club of Covington, Keep Covington Beautiful, Miracle League Northshore, NAMI, Pontchartrain Conservancy, Safe Harbor, Save Haven and the Covington Rotary Foundation.

The race begins 8 a.m. at the Bogue Falaya Park, ducks are $20 apiece. The fastest 10 ducks win a prize; Grand Prize is $1000 (need not be present to win). The Covington Rotary Club is a service organization that joins the efforts of over 1.2 million men and women worldwide in addressing the needs of local communities. Ducks and further information can be found at covrotary.org.

Pic of the Week

Pic of the Week: “Walker Percy”

Published by:

This picture of the Walker Percy Statue at Bogue Falaya Park was submitted by Sable-Rhoden Media.

The photo shows the 9-foot tall bronze monument honoring literary giant Walker Percy, who lived in Covington for much of his life. The statue, in Bogue Falaya Park, is the work of Covington sculptor Bill Binnings, who was a friend of Percy.

Percy was born May 28, 1916, and died May 10, 1990, 31 years ago. 

Live Music Local Events

Chillin’ at the River with Christian Serpas and Ghost Town

Published by:

The City of Covington’s free concert series Chillin’ at the River concludes Thursday at Bogue Falaya Park with the return of Christian Serpas and Ghost Town, so put on your boots and go country! Special guests Mande Milkshakers will be there to get everyone dancing. If you get hungry, Yum Yum Gimme Sum Food Truck will be there serving it up. The CBA will provide wine and Carnival in Covington will provide beer for the event.

The concert begins at 5:30 p.m. and ends at 8 p.m. Bring your chairs, your refreshments and your smile! For information about this event or any of the City of Covington public events, call 985-892-1873. Visit the City of Covington online at covla.com, or email them at gottaluvcov@covla.com.

Live Music Local Events

Sunset at the Landing Cancelled

Published by:

Sunset at the Landing is cancelled for April due to expected inclement weather. The next concert is scheduled for May 21, see you there! This article was updated on Thursday, April 15, 2021.

For more information about this concert series, or any other city events, call 985-892-1873.

Live Music Local Events

Chillin’ at the River with Typically Booked

Published by:

The City of Covington’s free concert series for April 2021, Chillin’ at the River, continues tonight with Typically Booked at the Bogue Falaya Park. The concerts take place every Thursday evening from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Check the flyer for location. The City of Covington reminds concertgoers that social distancing and mask mandates required by the state will be observed. Chairs and refreshments are welcome.

For more information, contact the City of Covington at 985-892-1873 or email gottaluvcov@covla.com. Visit the City of Covington online at covla.com, and find them on facebook.

Live Music Local Events

Chillin’ at the River Concert Series Announced

Published by:

The City of Covington announces its Chillin’ at the River Concert Series for April 2021, following State guidelines for social distancing, etc. The concerts are free and open to the public, taking place every Thursday in April from 5:30 p.m. til 8 p.m.

April 1 features John Boutte at the Covington Trailhead. Typically Booked play April 8 at the Bogue Falaya Park. The “Soul Train Revue” is a Reverend Peter Atkins Park with Dat Band on April 15. We return to the Covington Trailhead on April 22 with Fermin Ceballos. Christian Serpas & Ghost Town close out the April series on the 29th at the Bogue Falaya Park.

Local Events Local News

St. Paddy’s Free Concert at the River Postponed to Thursday, March 18th

Published by:

Due to the predicted rain on Wednesday, the free Chillin’ at the River concert has been postponed to Thursday, March 18th, 2021. Same time and place – the Bogue Falaya Park starting at 5:30 pm! Bring your lawn chairs, blankets and picnics. Four Unplugged and the City of Covington will still be celebrating St. Paddy’s, so don’t forget to wear your green!

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

Learn more about Four Unplugged:

Live Music Local Events

POSTPONED St. Paddy’s Concert at the Bogue Falaya Park with Four Unplugged March 17th

Published by:

UPDATE: this concert has been postponed to Thursday March 18th due to weather predictions. Read more here:

Next Wednesday we will be Chillin’ at the River again, this time for a St. Paddy’s concert featuring Four Unplugged! The City of Covington invites you to this free concert at the Bogue Falaya Park on Wednesday, March 17th from 5:30 – 8 pm. Bring your lawn chairs and picnics, and don’t forget to wear green!

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

About Four Unplugged

Four Unplugged is a popular local 6 piece band covering a wide variety of New Orleans seasoned music. Their sampling includes old rock ‘n roll classics, funk, Motown, dance party favorites, sing-alongs, hits from today and the always delicious slow-dance staples. They even throw in some Mardi Gras classics. Learn more about Four Unplugged at their website, www.fourunplugged.com

Local Events Local News

“Chillin’ at the River” Free Concert Postponed Due to Weather

Published by:

The City of Covington’s free concert “Chillin’ at the River” that was scheduled for Thursday, February 11th, 2021, has been postponed due to expected bad weather. Stay tuned for updates on a rescheduled date!

Original article here:
City Updates Local News

City of Covington Construction Project Update from Mayor Mark Johnson

Published by:

The following is from Covington Mayor Mark Johnson‘s most recent e-mail update. Sign up for updates at www.covla.com

The City has been quite active during the past 60 days regarding infrastructure improvements. Kudos to engineer Callie Baker for getting these engineering and construction contracts underway:

1) Repave Boston Street (LA Hwy 21) engineering design. Special thanks to Senator Patrick McMath and Representative Mark Wright for funding.
2) That said, the City currently has no money budgeted to repave any of our other downtown or Division of Spring streets. We will continue to focus on repairing, replacing and lining our aging and leaky sewer lines.
3) Updating water line on 14th Ave between Jefferson and Jahncke. Retired Fire Chief Richard Badon had lamented the lack of a hydrant in this area.
4) Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) Chlorine system maintenance.
5) The screening apparatus at WWTP has been broken for a couple of years. This means every object flushed into our sewer system has been hand-raked out of our waste water input. Repairing this apparatus is a good thing.
6) State law requires engineers calculate the load bearing of all bridges every two years. Like most of America, our bridge system is aging out.
7) Crepe myrtles planted near the sidewalk have rooted into the culverts on Lockwood between Columbia St. and Florida St. This has had an adverse effect on drainage. While repairing the drainage culverts, we will take this opportunity to also repair the sewer lines.
8) Miscellaneous repairs (phase I) per 2016 engineering study for WWTP.
9) Replace aging generator at WWTP. Plant receives, treats and discharges about one million gallons of effluent into the Tchefuncte River daily.
10) Extending Philip Drive water line to provide water to Fire Station #2.
11) Safety striping of 15th Avenue from Hubie Gallager to River Forest and at westward bound turn at 15th Ave and S. Tyler St
12) Engineering design for replacement of Lurline Drive from Karen to Division Street.*
13) Sewer line breaks along Lurline Drive identified by smoke testing and cameras will be repaired prior to replacing street.
14) Engineering State required guard rails for 15th Ave / Rattle Snake Branch bridge.
15) Engineering design for replacement of Columbia Street / Mile Branch. No $$s are currently budgeted for actual construction (estimated at $1M).
16) All abilities access path along the riverside of Bogue Falaya Park is coming in under budget (grant provided dollars, thank you Mayor Cooper’s administration). Unused grant funds are being applied to extending the path behind the playground along Mackie Creek.

*As a rule, I do not offer timelines for completion. My life experience as a builder / developer tells me such estimates are seldom correct, create false expectations and disappointment.

Also, a shout-out to Chief Administrative Officer Erin Bivona, Director of Finance Stephen Sanders and Public Works Director Chris Davis. The procurement process is tedious, heavily regulated, counter to typical business methods and miserable. Their work and expertise are critical to us overcoming the waterfall of bureaucracy.

www.covla.com

Live Music Local Events

Four Unplugged Plays Mardi Gras Themed Free Concert at the Bogue Falaya Park

Published by:

UPDATE: The Chillin’ at the River concert has been postponed due to expected bad weather. See the update article here:

Next Thursday we will be Chillin’ at the River again, this time for a Mardi Gras themed concert. On February 11th at 5:15 pm, join the City of Covington at the Bogue Falaya Park for some free live music and socially distanced fun!

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Bring your picnic, your lawn chairs and your beads! Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

Rollin’ on the 3 Rivers House Float Parade Happening NOW!

from the City of Covington Cultural Arts & Events FB page, click to see more!

The Covington Trailhead is all decked out for Mardi Gras! Check it out while you tour the Rollin’ on the 3 Rivers House Float Parade, going on now until Mardi Gras Day, February 16th, 2021.

Visit www.covla.com to sign up for Mayor Mark’s email updates!

from the City of Covington Cultural Arts & Events FB page, click to see more!
Local History

Local History: Bogue Falaya Wayside Park

Published by:

Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View Ron’s blog Tammany Family here.

Bogue Falaya Park in Covington was a happening place in the beginning of the 20th Century. There were all kinds of dances, plays and general get-togethers in the park. Hundreds of people passed through the entrance gates of the community park on summer weekends to sit by the river, enjoy the shade of the large pavilion and listen to music or see a show of some sort. Click on the images to see a larger version.

It was first opened in July, 1909, as indicated by the following newspaper article from the St. Tammany Farmer. Click on the image to enlarge the type.

Here are some pictures of the entrance to Bogue Falaya Park. The first one is in the 1910’s.

A previous entrance to Bogue Falaya Park, according to the postcard caption.

A March 27, 1920, Editorial About the Park
Heading for the Park Pavilion
The large park pavilion that was repeatedly damaged by floods
A July 4, 1939, gathering at the park
The park pavilion in 2016

According to Pat Clanton, the original large pavilion in the park was destroyed around 1915 and replaced with the current day pavilion, which is much smaller.

The large brick entrance posts are also interesting.

The entrance gate built in 1920 served pedestrians, but was modified a few years later to accommodate cars. The two pillars on either side of that gate were retained. They were restored in 2007 along with the historical marker that was placed on them originally.

On January 24, 1920, W. L. Stevenson wrote a letter to the St. Tammany Farmer proposing that the above brick entrance pillars be built.

The sign above is a replica of an earlier sign that adorned the entrance to the park. The new sign was built in 1993 using funds generated by the sale of a song-filled cassette about St. Tammany Rivers. CLICK HERE for more information.

The Documentation for Placement on the National Registry of Historic Places

On August 17, 2017, Bogue Falaya Park was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places. The narrative description of the park listed on the NRHP application went as follows (with some editing):

The Bogue Falaya River was pivotal in the development of Covington. Covington was at one point one of the major ports for cotton coming from Mississippi and Florida. In addition to cotton shipments were brick, lumber, beef, and poultry. In the early and mid-19th century, Covington was a central axis for trading and the Bogue Falaya served to link the town with Lake Pontchartrain and finally New Orleans.

Not only were goods and people moving from Covington to New Orleans, the residents of New Orleans were flocking to the Bogue Falaya riverbanks. Covington and the other towns were designated to be the 2nd healthiest place in the United States after the Civil War due to the significantly lower levels of disease related deaths. People would come to the Bogue Falaya to swim and to enjoy the clean air. Covington and the Bogue Falaya became such a prominent tourist attraction that early versions of bed and breakfasts were developed along the river and in the town to accommodate for these visitors.

Bogue Falaya Park is located on the eastern side of the city of Covington, Louisiana on the banks of the Falaya River. A thirteen-acre park located at the end of N. New Hampshire Street with a natural boundary of the river to the east and the suburban neighborhood to the west.

Within the park are two significant structures, the main being the pavilion situated at the end of the turning circle/ parking lot area within the park. The dominant feature of the park, the current pavilion was constructed in 1915 and has acted continuously as an important community gathering center for the city of Covington.

The second are the gates to the park, donated in 1920 by a Dr. Lawrence Stevenson. The remaining features of the gate include brick and mortar posts with marble plaques and three cast iron cannon balls a top each post. Originally larger, they have been receded to allow for vehicle access to the park.

In addition to these primary features, there is also an original lifeguard chair dating to approximately the 1950s. A dilapidated concession stand and newer construction wooden playground are also on the site and are non-contributing elements to the park.

The park offers a variety of vegetation featuring several live oak and long leaf yellow pine trees throughout.

Bogue Falaya Park, located within the city limits of Covington, Louisiana, was opened on July 1, 1909, along the banks of the Bogue Falaya River. Already a popular recreation site because of the river, the park developed into a central gathering space for community members of Covington.

The area is mostly sand with the only paved areas being the driveway into the park and turnaround area directly in front of the pavilion. The turnaround area features a small sculpture, stone benches, and is the most manicured/planned area in terms of vegetation.

The park has many trees most of which are cypress, oak, or long leaf yellow pine, which are common to the area. The ground is primarily sand, with some small growth of grasses. As it was always meant to be a recreational space and not a designed landscape, the park still retains its integrity as a contributing site and is the only resource of the park itself that dates to the original opening in 1909.

The lifeguard chair is a contributing object. The wooden portions of the chair (seat and back) have rotted away, but one can still easily tell that this was a lifeguard chair. It stands on the banks of the Bogue Falaya River and helps to illustrate the recreational aspect that the park and river played. It is constructed of pipe metal and fits the typical design of a lifeguard chair, being taller so that that lifeguard could see over crowds and well into the water. It dates to the 1950s and is thus, within the period of significance for the park.

The Bogue Falaya Park is significant for recreation and entertainment as the park has provided a recreational space that was not only used by locals, but residents of New Orleans as well, for over 100 years. The historic resources within the park have been continually used by residents and visitors and retain a high degree of integrity.

The park itself provides a rural oasis within the city of Covington away from the hustle and bustle of the downtown area. The park continues to this day to be a significant recreational resource for the community

Due to the relative health of the city of Covington and the access to the river, recreation became a large part of the Bogue Falaya and its banks. The land for the park was bought from G.R Tolson in 1908 by the City of Covington to establish a 13-acre park. The park was officially opened on July 1st, 1909. The city maintained the park from that time until 1938 when it was gifted to the State of Louisiana who managed it until 1978 when it was given back to Covington.

The original pavilion was constructed in 1907 and was destroyed in a storm in 1915, which necessitated the building of the existing structure. Even prior to the formal designation of the park, this original pavilion and riverbank area was a popular destination and a source of pride for residents and a featured tourism spot.

Multiple post cards were developed in this time with renderings and photographs of the pavilion. One shows visitors walking to the pavilion with their buggies parked in the grass.

Up until the 1960s, the park was a popular swimming spot for the residents of Covington, and on the weekends, residents of New Orleans. The pavilion was used as a gathering space for visitors to the park. The pavilion offers an open space for people to gather under and, when the park was still open for swimming, it offered a counter where you could purchase a basket of swimming essentials.

Behind the counter were showers and changing areas for swimmers. In the front, to the left-hand side was a concession stand where visitors could buy an assortment of refreshments. A jukebox was also in the pavilion. During the period of significance, the pavilion and park were open all night and became a place for teenagers to dance.

Current residents of the town of Covington recall that on the weekends there was barely a section of beach left to lay your blanket and fondly spoke of their youth – swimming during the day and dancing with friends into the evening.

The river, as told above, was the heart and soul of both commerce and leisure in Covington for a significant amount of time and a main reason Covington became a destination spot. The river was the center of life in Covington – where people would relax, wash their clothes, and even baptize their young. This continued up to and past the development of Bogue Falaya Park.

The park was built to accommodate the recreation of the river. The evolution of this area into a park is a natural progression of the use of the space, as represented by the fact that the original pavilion predates the land being bought for the park by one year.

Clearly, the need was there for a structure to provide shade, the needed facilities for such a popular swimming spot, and a place to gather as a community. The vitality and popularity of the park and pavilion continued up until the late 1960s when the river became polluted and the park went into a state of disrepair. In the early 1980s, the park was reopened and in 1984, it underwent a renovation. New sand was brought in, debris was cleared away, and the pavilion was cleaned and repainted.

The Bogue Falaya Park is significant because of the popularity of the park among residents of Covington and the pivotal role the pavilion played in providing services, entertainment, and a break from the heat during a time when tourism and recreation on the Northshore was at an unsurpassed rate. This park provided the main recreational access to the river and was a true center of the community during the hot months. The park and pavilion were also used for private family parties and gatherings as well as public town events throughout the year.

The Pavilion

The original pavilion was built in 1907 and was destroyed in a storm in 1915. The existing pavilion was constructed that same year to replace the damaged original. The pavilion is a free-standing wood construction building located at the end of the parking lot turning circle and serves as the focal point in the park.

The pavilion is a one-story structure and is dominated by a large open air room. A set of five wooden stairs with a railing on both sides brings visitors up to a small inset doorway with wood trim painted the color tan. The interior space from the front entrance opens into a large square area with low wooden benches along the perimeter.

The back wall contains two sets of double doors, behind which is now storage/prepping area. This space was originally where visitors would rent swimming equipment and housed the changing areas for each sex. To the right and left of these doors are the current restrooms. A later addition, on the back-left section of the pavilion facing the back wall is a handicapped accessible restroom. To the left of the main structure is a low side addition, which used to serve as the concession area. The building retains a high degree of historic integrity for location, setting, design, materials, workmanship, feel and association. It has been continually used by the community for over 100 years and its historic features have been retained while also updating certain aspects of the building for modern uses. The pavilion is over 50 years old and retains much of its integrity from its construction in 1915, with some modifications and upgrades as stated above.

The gates are the next significant structure in the park and lie at the only vehicle access entrance to the park at the end of N. New Hampshire Street. Constructed in 1920 the gates were a gift to the park by Dr. Stevenson and were dedicated to his parents and the Rebel Ram Manassas, which was a submarine that served in the civil war to defend Louisiana.

Each of the two sides of the gate sit on a concrete footer. The focal points of the gate are two redbrick and mortar structures with a square concrete footer and a marble base. On the capstone are three cast iron cannon balls.

On the southern elevation of the eastern gate the plaque reads “Original Park Gates erected 1920, Restored 2007” and features a carving of the gates on the top of the plaque. The east and west elevations include a cement placeholder for the plaque.

The north elevation has a marble plaque with a carving of the Rebel Ram Manassas and reads “My Parents, Projectors of the Rebel Ram Manassas, Defender of Louisiana in The Civil War, Dr. Stevenson, 1920”. Dr. Stevenson donated the gates in 1920 in honor of his parents and the CSS Ram Manassas.

The CSS Ram Manassas was active during the Civil War as a part of the Confederate fleet. The Manassas has a unique history and was originally designed in Massachusetts as a towboat and used as a steam icebreaker. The ship was captured and purchased by Captain John Stevenson, who was the father of Dr. Stevenson. Captain Stevenson turned the icebreaker he had purchased into a ram – which is an entirely ironclad ship run by steam meant to (literally) ram other ships and to be impermeable to cannonballs.

The Ram Manassas was one of the first ironclad ships built for the Confederacy. Eventually, the ship was defeated, but its story offers a unique perspective into naval warfare during the Civil War. This history is especially relevant to the significance of this property due to its connection to the rivers.

Originally the gates had iron gates to enclose the park. These were removed with the increase in vehicle traffic to the park. Over the years, the gates were vandalized and fell into disrepair. The cannonballs were stolen and the plaques damaged. In 2007, the gates and plaques underwent restoration. The cannonballs were replaced with ones to match. The gates are contributing objects as, although they have been restored with the cannonballs replaced, they are over 50 years old and retain their historic integrity. The town appreciates and is aware of this history as was shown by the hard work that was put in to carefully restoring the gates in 2007.

Today, the park is used daily by locals and visitors alike. The pavilion is still available for private rental for celebrations and gatherings and is often booked. Town-organized events are also held in the structure, such as the philharmonic music event series and the Halloween Monster Mash.

The park is a source of joy and pride for all the residents of Covington and remains an important asset to the community. The gates to the park are also significant in and of themselves and offer a piece of history about some of the residents of the town.

The Bogue Falaya Park has served as a key recreational facility in Covington since it was first created in 1907-08.

See also:
Sign Dedication at the Park Entrance
Bogue Falaya Park Pavilion

Visit tammanyfamily.blogspot.com to see more great local history!

Local Events

Chillin’ at the River with Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours this Saturday

Published by:

Come out to one last concert of the year at the Bogue Falaya Park! The day after Christmas, Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours will perform for a free live concert on the river.

On Saturday December 26th, the City of Covington presents Grammy nominated Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours at the Bogue Falaya Park from 4 – 6:30 pm. A continuation of the Chillin’ at the River concert series, guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics as food and beverages will not be provided. Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Afterwards, take a stroll around downtown Covington and visit the many unique shops and fine dining restaurants.

Read more about the Cajun Troubadours here:

Local Events

Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours – Chillin’ at the River Dec 26

Published by:

from the Cajun Troubadours‘ website

On Saturday December 26th, the City of Covington presents Grammy nominated Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours at the Bogue Falaya Park. This free concert will be from 4 – 6:30 pm. A continuation of the Chillin’ at the River concert series, guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics as food and beverages will not be provided. Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Afterwards, take a stroll around downtown Covington and visit the many unique shops and fine dining restaurants.

About Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours

From the Cajun Troubadours‘ website: “Cameron, the seven-time Cajun accordion contest winner, has now established himself as a favorite among many Cajun music fans in Louisiana. He has now recorded on three CDs; the most recent being “The Mid-City Aces” featuring Michael Dupuy and Gina Forsyth and the brand new “Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours” self titled album.
“In November of 2020, the band’s debut self-titled album, “Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours” was nominated for a Grammy Award in the category of Best Regional Roots Music Album.”

“Twas the night after Christmas
And no cookies were left.
Cajun music filled the air
as we did the two-step!”
– Mayor Mark Johnson

Sign up for Mayor Mark’s emails at www.covla.com

Live Music Local Events

Last Chillin’ at the River Free Concert Features Boogie Falaya

Published by:

The last concert of the City of Covington’s Chillin’ at the River free local music series is this Thursday, November 12th, 2020. Featuring Boogie Falaya, concerts are 5 – 7:30 pm at the Bogue Falaya Wayside Park, 213 Park Drive in the heart of downtown Covington. Parking is free at nearby public parking oxlots and throughout the downtown neighborhoods.

Chillin’ at the River last week with Dat Band, from the City of Covington Cultural Arts & Events FB Page

For those who have made it out to any of the Chillin’ at the River concerts this fall, the Bogue Falaya Park has made a perfect setting to relax and unwind on the River while enjoying some nice local music. Guests are encouraged to bring blankets, chairs and picnics as food and drink sales are not available. These free concerts put on by the City of Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts & Events provide residents and visitors with safe, family-friendly entertainment.

All concerts are weather permitting. Follow the City of Covingon on Facebook for current info. www.covla.com

Live Music Local Events

Chillin’ at the River Continues with Dat Band at the Bogue Falaya Park

Published by:

Spread out and chill out to some live music – social distancing style.

For those who have made it out to any of the Chillin’ at the River concerts this fall, the Bogue Falaya Park has made a perfect setting to relax and unwind on the River while enjoying some nice local music. Guests are encouraged to bring blankets, chairs and picnics as food and drink sales are not available. These free concerts put on by the City of Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts & Events provide residents and visitors with safe, family-friendly entertainment.

Concerts are 5 – 7:30 pm at the Bogue Falaya Park, 213 Park Drive in the heart of downtown Covington. Parking is free at nearby public parking oxlots and throughout the downtown neighborhoods. Please be sure not to block driveways. After the concert, check out Covington’s eclectic shops and award-winning restaurants.

THE LINEUP:

Nov 5 – The DAT Band
Nov 12 – Boogie Falaya

All concerts are weather permitting. Follow the City of Covingon on Facebook for current info.

The City of Covington Office of Cultural Arts and Events is dedicated to providing residents and visitors with a variety of unique and exciting entertainment options. For more information, contact the City of Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts and Events at (985) 892-1873. Learn more about Covington, Louisiana history here.

Live Music Local Events

Chillin’ at the River – Free Concerts at the Bogue Falaya Park

Published by:

Spread out and chill out to some live music – social distancing style.

From Louisiana Northshore:

We’ve all missed live music this year, here in the land where jazz was born and Louisiana music is part of everyday life. To ensure live music could return this fall to the music-loving town, Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts and Events have moved the “Rockin’ the Rails” outdoor concert series from the Covington Trailhead to the open spaces of downtown Covington’s parks.

Now dubbed “Chillin at the River,” the concerts continue every Thursday through November 12th at Bogue Falaya Park, 213 Park Drive in the heart of downtown Covington–just south of historic Christ Episcopal Church on New Hampshire Street. After the concert, be sure to visit Covington’s eclectic shops and award-winning restaurants. 

THE LINEUP:

Oct 15 – The New Orleans Mystics (at Rev. Peter Atkins Park)
Oct 22 – The Iguanas
Oct 29 – John Papa Gros – Tribute to The Night Tripper, Dr. John
Nov 5 – The DAT Band
Nov 12 – Boogie Falaya

Concerts are still 5:00 – 7:30 pm and still free and open to the public. Food or drink sales may not be available; guests are welcome to bring ice chests/picnics/adult beverages if they wish. Parking is free at nearby public parking oxlots and throughout the downtown neighborhoods. Please be sure not to block driveways. 

All concerts are weather permitting. Follow the City of Covingon on Facebook for current info.

The City of Covington Office of Cultural Arts and Events is dedicated to providing residents and visitors with a variety of unique and exciting entertainment options. For more information, contact the City of Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts and Events at (985) 892-1873. Learn more about Covington, Louisiana history here.

Local Events Non Profit Spotlight

6th Annual Quack-A-Falaya Duck Race This Saturday

Published by:

The Covington Rotary Club announces their 6th Annual Quack-A-Falaya Rubber Duck Race on the Bogue Falaya this Saturday September 26th, 2020. This Celebration of Clean Water and Family Recreation was rescheduled from its traditional spring date due to COVID.

From the Covington Rotary Club:

Support the efforts of the Rotary Club of Covington by buying a duck or two! Fastest duck earns its owner $1500. We’ll also have prizes for the top 10 RUBBER DUCKS.

To ensure we keep to physical distancing protocols, we will LIVESTREAM the race on the Covington Rotary Club and Quack-A-Falaya Facebook pages. Winners will be contacted and need not be present to win.

If you would like to support the efforts of the Covington Rotary Club, you can also make a straight up donation on the eventbrite.com page. THANK YOU! Visit the Facebook pages or www.covrotary.org for more information on the efforts of Covington Rotarians. We are People of Action! Come join us!

The race begins 9 am at the Bogue Falaya Wayside Park.
Sponsor a duck for $20 here: www.eventbrite.com

Proceeds will benefit: Miracle League Northshore, Keep Covington Beautiful, the Covington Boys and Girls Club, the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, and the efforts of the Covington Rotary Foundation (501 c 3)

Local History

Covington History: 1988 Historical Walking Tour

Published by:

Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View his blog Tammany Family here.

The City of Covington compiled a list of interesting buildings in the city so that visitors (or local residents) could take a walking tour that showcased the historical structures. Below is the list of buildings on the “walk through history” tour promoted during the city’s 175th anniversary in 1988, guided by the St. Tammany Historical Society, with information supplied by Todd Valois.

Walk Through The History of Covington

On July 4, 1813, John Wharton Collins, a New Orleans merchant, founded the city that became Covington on the edge of a parcel of land he owned in the fork between the Bogue Falaya and Tchefuncte Rivers. Collins laid out an unusual system of streets and squares with central lots and alleys that are popularly known as “ox lots.” Collins named the town Wharton and dedicated it to Thomas Jefferson. When the legislature chartered the town in 1816, it was renamed with Collins strong objection to honor General Leonard Covington of Natchez who distinguished himself in the War of 1812.

Two fires destroyed most buildings built before 1880. The original urban design is still visible, as are examples of late nineteenth and early twentieth century storefronts and residences. Visitors may savor the character of a small town at the turn of the century, enjoy shopping, dining and strolling under the majestic live oaks that frame many of Covington’s streetscapes.

Division of Morgan, Commerce and Virtue – Laid out in 1813 as an “Avenue” along with the Division of St. John. Based on the same plan as Canal Street in New Orleans, a tree-lined neutral ground existed down the center of the Avenue. Joseph and Alfred Theard laid out the area in lots and squares in 1879. For the most part, the lots and squares were sold as family homes. As early as 1890, several businesses were opened, establishing the area as an industrial site. In this area were the St. Tammany Ice and Manufacturing Co., the Mackie Pine Oil Plan, Covington Grocery and Grain Wholesalers and the Covington Train Depot.

Covington Cemetery – On December 27, 1817, the founder of Covington, John Wharton Collins, died at his home in New Orleans. He was buried in Covington in accordance with his final request. He was interred on the corner of Columbia and Kirkland. His widow sold the surrounding land to the city five years later for a cemetery.

The Old Railroad Depot, 503 N. New Hampshire – On May 16, 1888, the East Louisiana Railroad reached Covington, heralding an economic boom. The original depot faced New Hampshire Street with a passenger and freight terminal facing east. During the mid-1900s, the Depot was moved one block to the present site (now a restaurant).

Covington Waterworks, c. 1930, 414 N. Theard. Stucco Mission Style building with baroque style shaped gable parapets and a Spanish style roof. It is the only building of this architectural style in Covington, and is located in the Morgan, Commerce & Virtue.

Old Covington Firehouse, c. 1930, 406 N. Theard. This two-story wood frame structure was built in 1940. Living quarters were on the top story and served as home to the family who answered the phone and sounded the alarm for the 3rd Ward (Folsom, Covington and Mandeville). In 1949 the Volunteer Fire Department received a new Seagraves Fire Engine. It was housed in this building while serving the community until the early 1970s. The building is now the home of the Covington Downtown Development Commission.

C.J. Schoen Middle School, c. 1914, 300 N. Jefferson. Formerly Covington Grammar School, this structure is the oldest school building in use in the parish. The school building was on this site as early as 1909.

Commercial Hotel, Patrick Hotel and Roubion Hotel, E. Gibson. In conjunction with the railroad boom, several hotels sprang up along the track. The Commercial Hotel and Patrick Hotel on the north side of Gibson Street were built after the 1906 fire (now commerce buildings and offices).

Covington Bank & Trust Building., c. 1885, 308 N. Columbia. The Bank of Covington was established in these original quarters. It is the oldest commercial building in Covington.

H.J. Smith and Sons Hardware and Museum, c. 1876, 308 N. Columbia. Oldest hardware and general store in the parish, housing unique artifacts on the history of Covington. Of note are the dugout cypress canoe and lead coffin. H.J. Smith and Sons was founded July 4, 1876.

Abadie Family House, c. 1925, N. Lee Lane. Built by Hyacinth Louis Abadie on the old Bogue Falaya River Bridge Road, it is the site of the Louis Abadie store and bakery, c. 1885. Home remembered throughout Covington for its beautiful gardens and landscape. It remained a family home for more than 50 years until it was sold in 1981. Across the street is a mural, “Christmas in the Country,” painted by Elizabeth Bowab Joanen depicting turn of the century Victorian cottages. (1993)

Courthouse Square and Historic Oaks, 510 E. Boston. The first parish courthouse was located across the Bogue Falaya River in Claiborne. The second courthouse was erected on this site in Covington, c. 1850, to be demolished and replaced by the third courthouse, c. 1896. The fourth and present parish courthouse is graced by oaks planted more than 245 years ago, predating our street plan of 1813.

The Southern Hotel Building, c. 1907, 428 E. Boston. This building was constructed at a cost of $100,000. There were once 200 feet of galleries overlooking New Hampshire Street, a formal garden and tennis court. Tame and exotic animals resided in cages in the central lobby surrounding an artesian fountain (now parish offices).

The Bogue Falaya Mens Club, Old MCB Library, c. 1905. 131 N. New Hampshire. Constructed in 1903, the ladies of Minerva’s Chosen Band purchased this building for the town’s first lending. library in 1907.

The Christ Episcopal Chapel, 120 N. New Hampshire. Organized and founded in 1846, it is the oldest public building in use in St. Tammany Parish.

Original Gates to Bogue Falaya Park, End of N. New Hampshire. August 11, 1908, Dr. George R. Tolson sold to the town of Covington the 13 acres that make up the Bogue Falaya Park.

Patecek Building, 301 Columbia. In the early months of 1995, total restoration of this historic building began. Built shortly after the Great Fire of 1898, the building provides a beautiful example of turn of the century commercial architecture. For more than 60 years, 301 Columbia has housed retail stores and holds the distinction of its second floor being Covington’s first telephone exchange.

Covington Bank & Trust II, 236 Columbia. Originally built in 1907, it served as the second Covington Bank & Trust building. The structure also housed a drug store and attorneys’ offices on the second floor. After the bank’s closure in 1934, it housed the first chain grocery store in Covington. During the tenure of the latest owner, the tile facade was added and renovations were extended on the second floor.

Seiler Building, 434 N. Columbia. Built in the early 1900s and still known as the Seiler Building, this historic landmark once housed one of the most prominent saloons, cafe and oyster bars in St. Tammany Parish. Of note were the massive solid mahogany bars and counters throughout this fine example of turn of the century urban architecture.

Champagne Grocery, 427 N. Columbia. This beautiful structure once housed the Champagne Grocery, founded in 1919, which remained open for more than 60 years. In a time when groceries were delivered and for many years after Champagne’s was an important part of everyday life in Covington. When one thinks of the small town grocery and a distant way of life, one thinks of Champagne’s.

Old Freezer Plant, 526 N. New Hampshire. Built in 1945 as the Growers Cooperative Association and better known as the “Old Freezer Plant,” this building holds the distinction of being the first and only community freezer plant in the area. At a time when most families did not have their own freezers, this building once housed many a holiday turkey or ham. Many residents still remember picking up their store of meat from the freezer.

Columbia Street Landing, End of Columbia. The birthplace of Covington, this active harbor once docked schooners and steamers and brought many early settlers to Covington. Established in the early 1800s, it was a vital link to other river cities transporting cotton, lumber, bricks, whiskey and mail. Oyster luggers used the port to transport fresh oysters to the community through the 1930s. Today, Diamond Bullet Design, the creator of this web site, is located in the home at the street’s end, just above the landing.

Covington Ice House, 322 N. Florida. This structure was built in 1910 and served as the Covington Ice House until the 1920s when it became home to D’Aquin’s Wholesale Grain Company. Blossman Gas Company occupied the building from 1934 until it was renovated as Tyler Downtown Drugs and Cafe Cabaret.

Check out Ron Barthet’s blog Tammany Family for more great local history! More photos related to this post here.