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Local Events Local News

St. Paddy’s Free Concert at the River Postponed to Thursday, March 18th

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Due to the predicted rain on Wednesday, the free Chillin’ at the River concert has been postponed to Thursday, March 18th, 2021. Same time and place – the Bogue Falaya Park starting at 5:30 pm! Bring your lawn chairs, blankets and picnics. Four Unplugged and the City of Covington will still be celebrating St. Paddy’s, so don’t forget to wear your green!

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

Learn more about Four Unplugged:

Live Music Local Events

POSTPONED St. Paddy’s Concert at the Bogue Falaya Park with Four Unplugged March 17th

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UPDATE: this concert has been postponed to Thursday March 18th due to weather predictions. Read more here:

Next Wednesday we will be Chillin’ at the River again, this time for a St. Paddy’s concert featuring Four Unplugged! The City of Covington invites you to this free concert at the Bogue Falaya Park on Wednesday, March 17th from 5:30 – 8 pm. Bring your lawn chairs and picnics, and don’t forget to wear green!

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

About Four Unplugged

Four Unplugged is a popular local 6 piece band covering a wide variety of New Orleans seasoned music. Their sampling includes old rock ‘n roll classics, funk, Motown, dance party favorites, sing-alongs, hits from today and the always delicious slow-dance staples. They even throw in some Mardi Gras classics. Learn more about Four Unplugged at their website, www.fourunplugged.com

Local History

Local History: Bogue Falaya Shopping Plaza

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Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View Ron’s blog Tammany Family here.

Back in the 1970’s Covington had its own shopping mall, the Bogue Falaya Plaza. It was a medium-sized all indoor shopping center with a number of shops, among them a Beall’s clothing store, a National Supermarket, a Merle Norman, Photo-Sonics, Eileen’s Expressions (a gift and greeting card store), The Toggery Shop, Commercial Bank (later known as First National Bank) and travel agent service with Don Phillips, and Murphy’s Restaurant (inside the Morgan and Lindsey variety store). 

Other businesses located in the mall were Little Villa, Bruhn Jewelry, Montgomery Ward, Mall Mart, Video Showplace, Red Carpet, a Numismatics store, Tillie’s Shirt Shop, Sound Trak, Covington Sportsman, Ken Nolan, Northlake Vision Center, Mall Mart, Both of You Hair, Bogue Falaya Hairdressers, Video Showplace, Fox Photo, Shoe Town, S&H Greenstamps store, and two attorneys offices. 

Some of the stores in the mall area included Sherwin Williams, Otasco’s, Gibsons, Pasquale’s Pizza, and Fox Photo. 

The east side entrance, Morgan & Lindsey at left.

The mall featured a center courtyard and reflecting pool, a landscaped exterior, big parking lot and a busy schedule of community-based events. Something entertaining for the shoppers was always going on. The mall featured a variety of community events, from fashion shows to milk drinking contests. 

There was so much going on that WARB radio station even had a permanent remote broadcasting booth set up in the mall, with live broadcasts from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. every afternoon so people could stop by and visit while at the mall. It was called “The MusicCube,” and it is pictured above. For more information about WARB, click here and click here.

What was where in 1983. Click on above map to enlarge.

A Google Maps Image with outline of the former shopping center.

Here are a few photographs of the inside of the Mall taken during a fashion photo shoot by Art Lemane in 1972 for Pathways Magazine. 

A number of dances and proms were held inside the mall. 

Pat Clanton served as Promotions Coordinator for the shopping center, putting on Boat Shows, Car Shows, Fashion Shows, Art Shows, and Dance Shows and bringing in Santa at Christmas time.   “We had different contests as well, band concerts and battle of the bands. There was a whole week dedicated to senior citizens, and we brought in plays, singing groups, and music presentation, accompanied by cakes and punch,” she said.

1972 Article from Pathways Magazine about Bruhn’s Jewelry

Staff of Photo-Sonics

Earl and Helen Wilson

The Bealls Clothing Store was a very popular business in the mall. 

Morgan & Lindsey Store

The Morgan & Lindsey Store had 18,000 square feet of shopping area. When Morgan & Lindsey began business in Covington, it had seven employees. It quickly outgrew its building and became one of the first stores to open in the Bogue Falaya Plaza in the summer of 1970. At that time, the staff had grown to 30 store employees and ten restaurant employees. Richard P. Dyes was manager for more than 15 years. Here are some photos. 

In the picture on the right, the people are identified from left to right as N. F. Van-Tilburg, J. C. Wynn, D.M. Allen, R. P. Dyess, and J. H. Shannon. 

Unfortunately, the mall caught fire on March 11, 1984, and the stores suffered extensive fire, smoke and water damage.

 Here are some photographs I took of the inside of the shopping mall after the fire when the various stores were being cleaned out. 

See also:
Photos of Street Scenes around Covington in the 1970’s
More Photos of the Bogue Falaya Plaza Shopping Mall

Local Events Local News

“Chillin’ at the River” Free Concert Postponed Due to Weather

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The City of Covington’s free concert “Chillin’ at the River” that was scheduled for Thursday, February 11th, 2021, has been postponed due to expected bad weather. Stay tuned for updates on a rescheduled date!

Original article here:
Live Music Local Events

Four Unplugged Plays Mardi Gras Themed Free Concert at the Bogue Falaya Park

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UPDATE: The Chillin’ at the River concert has been postponed due to expected bad weather. See the update article here:

Next Thursday we will be Chillin’ at the River again, this time for a Mardi Gras themed concert. On February 11th at 5:15 pm, join the City of Covington at the Bogue Falaya Park for some free live music and socially distanced fun!

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Bring your picnic, your lawn chairs and your beads! Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

Rollin’ on the 3 Rivers House Float Parade Happening NOW!

from the City of Covington Cultural Arts & Events FB page, click to see more!

The Covington Trailhead is all decked out for Mardi Gras! Check it out while you tour the Rollin’ on the 3 Rivers House Float Parade, going on now until Mardi Gras Day, February 16th, 2021.

Visit www.covla.com to sign up for Mayor Mark’s email updates!

from the City of Covington Cultural Arts & Events FB page, click to see more!
Local History

Local History: Bogue Falaya Wayside Park

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Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View Ron’s blog Tammany Family here.

Bogue Falaya Park in Covington was a happening place in the beginning of the 20th Century. There were all kinds of dances, plays and general get-togethers in the park. Hundreds of people passed through the entrance gates of the community park on summer weekends to sit by the river, enjoy the shade of the large pavilion and listen to music or see a show of some sort. Click on the images to see a larger version.

It was first opened in July, 1909, as indicated by the following newspaper article from the St. Tammany Farmer. Click on the image to enlarge the type.

Here are some pictures of the entrance to Bogue Falaya Park. The first one is in the 1910’s.

A previous entrance to Bogue Falaya Park, according to the postcard caption.

A March 27, 1920, Editorial About the Park
Heading for the Park Pavilion
The large park pavilion that was repeatedly damaged by floods
A July 4, 1939, gathering at the park
The park pavilion in 2016

According to Pat Clanton, the original large pavilion in the park was destroyed around 1915 and replaced with the current day pavilion, which is much smaller.

The large brick entrance posts are also interesting.

The entrance gate built in 1920 served pedestrians, but was modified a few years later to accommodate cars. The two pillars on either side of that gate were retained. They were restored in 2007 along with the historical marker that was placed on them originally.

On January 24, 1920, W. L. Stevenson wrote a letter to the St. Tammany Farmer proposing that the above brick entrance pillars be built.

The sign above is a replica of an earlier sign that adorned the entrance to the park. The new sign was built in 1993 using funds generated by the sale of a song-filled cassette about St. Tammany Rivers. CLICK HERE for more information.

The Documentation for Placement on the National Registry of Historic Places

On August 17, 2017, Bogue Falaya Park was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places. The narrative description of the park listed on the NRHP application went as follows (with some editing):

The Bogue Falaya River was pivotal in the development of Covington. Covington was at one point one of the major ports for cotton coming from Mississippi and Florida. In addition to cotton shipments were brick, lumber, beef, and poultry. In the early and mid-19th century, Covington was a central axis for trading and the Bogue Falaya served to link the town with Lake Pontchartrain and finally New Orleans.

Not only were goods and people moving from Covington to New Orleans, the residents of New Orleans were flocking to the Bogue Falaya riverbanks. Covington and the other towns were designated to be the 2nd healthiest place in the United States after the Civil War due to the significantly lower levels of disease related deaths. People would come to the Bogue Falaya to swim and to enjoy the clean air. Covington and the Bogue Falaya became such a prominent tourist attraction that early versions of bed and breakfasts were developed along the river and in the town to accommodate for these visitors.

Bogue Falaya Park is located on the eastern side of the city of Covington, Louisiana on the banks of the Falaya River. A thirteen-acre park located at the end of N. New Hampshire Street with a natural boundary of the river to the east and the suburban neighborhood to the west.

Within the park are two significant structures, the main being the pavilion situated at the end of the turning circle/ parking lot area within the park. The dominant feature of the park, the current pavilion was constructed in 1915 and has acted continuously as an important community gathering center for the city of Covington.

The second are the gates to the park, donated in 1920 by a Dr. Lawrence Stevenson. The remaining features of the gate include brick and mortar posts with marble plaques and three cast iron cannon balls a top each post. Originally larger, they have been receded to allow for vehicle access to the park.

In addition to these primary features, there is also an original lifeguard chair dating to approximately the 1950s. A dilapidated concession stand and newer construction wooden playground are also on the site and are non-contributing elements to the park.

The park offers a variety of vegetation featuring several live oak and long leaf yellow pine trees throughout.

Bogue Falaya Park, located within the city limits of Covington, Louisiana, was opened on July 1, 1909, along the banks of the Bogue Falaya River. Already a popular recreation site because of the river, the park developed into a central gathering space for community members of Covington.

The area is mostly sand with the only paved areas being the driveway into the park and turnaround area directly in front of the pavilion. The turnaround area features a small sculpture, stone benches, and is the most manicured/planned area in terms of vegetation.

The park has many trees most of which are cypress, oak, or long leaf yellow pine, which are common to the area. The ground is primarily sand, with some small growth of grasses. As it was always meant to be a recreational space and not a designed landscape, the park still retains its integrity as a contributing site and is the only resource of the park itself that dates to the original opening in 1909.

The lifeguard chair is a contributing object. The wooden portions of the chair (seat and back) have rotted away, but one can still easily tell that this was a lifeguard chair. It stands on the banks of the Bogue Falaya River and helps to illustrate the recreational aspect that the park and river played. It is constructed of pipe metal and fits the typical design of a lifeguard chair, being taller so that that lifeguard could see over crowds and well into the water. It dates to the 1950s and is thus, within the period of significance for the park.

The Bogue Falaya Park is significant for recreation and entertainment as the park has provided a recreational space that was not only used by locals, but residents of New Orleans as well, for over 100 years. The historic resources within the park have been continually used by residents and visitors and retain a high degree of integrity.

The park itself provides a rural oasis within the city of Covington away from the hustle and bustle of the downtown area. The park continues to this day to be a significant recreational resource for the community

Due to the relative health of the city of Covington and the access to the river, recreation became a large part of the Bogue Falaya and its banks. The land for the park was bought from G.R Tolson in 1908 by the City of Covington to establish a 13-acre park. The park was officially opened on July 1st, 1909. The city maintained the park from that time until 1938 when it was gifted to the State of Louisiana who managed it until 1978 when it was given back to Covington.

The original pavilion was constructed in 1907 and was destroyed in a storm in 1915, which necessitated the building of the existing structure. Even prior to the formal designation of the park, this original pavilion and riverbank area was a popular destination and a source of pride for residents and a featured tourism spot.

Multiple post cards were developed in this time with renderings and photographs of the pavilion. One shows visitors walking to the pavilion with their buggies parked in the grass.

Up until the 1960s, the park was a popular swimming spot for the residents of Covington, and on the weekends, residents of New Orleans. The pavilion was used as a gathering space for visitors to the park. The pavilion offers an open space for people to gather under and, when the park was still open for swimming, it offered a counter where you could purchase a basket of swimming essentials.

Behind the counter were showers and changing areas for swimmers. In the front, to the left-hand side was a concession stand where visitors could buy an assortment of refreshments. A jukebox was also in the pavilion. During the period of significance, the pavilion and park were open all night and became a place for teenagers to dance.

Current residents of the town of Covington recall that on the weekends there was barely a section of beach left to lay your blanket and fondly spoke of their youth – swimming during the day and dancing with friends into the evening.

The river, as told above, was the heart and soul of both commerce and leisure in Covington for a significant amount of time and a main reason Covington became a destination spot. The river was the center of life in Covington – where people would relax, wash their clothes, and even baptize their young. This continued up to and past the development of Bogue Falaya Park.

The park was built to accommodate the recreation of the river. The evolution of this area into a park is a natural progression of the use of the space, as represented by the fact that the original pavilion predates the land being bought for the park by one year.

Clearly, the need was there for a structure to provide shade, the needed facilities for such a popular swimming spot, and a place to gather as a community. The vitality and popularity of the park and pavilion continued up until the late 1960s when the river became polluted and the park went into a state of disrepair. In the early 1980s, the park was reopened and in 1984, it underwent a renovation. New sand was brought in, debris was cleared away, and the pavilion was cleaned and repainted.

The Bogue Falaya Park is significant because of the popularity of the park among residents of Covington and the pivotal role the pavilion played in providing services, entertainment, and a break from the heat during a time when tourism and recreation on the Northshore was at an unsurpassed rate. This park provided the main recreational access to the river and was a true center of the community during the hot months. The park and pavilion were also used for private family parties and gatherings as well as public town events throughout the year.

The Pavilion

The original pavilion was built in 1907 and was destroyed in a storm in 1915. The existing pavilion was constructed that same year to replace the damaged original. The pavilion is a free-standing wood construction building located at the end of the parking lot turning circle and serves as the focal point in the park.

The pavilion is a one-story structure and is dominated by a large open air room. A set of five wooden stairs with a railing on both sides brings visitors up to a small inset doorway with wood trim painted the color tan. The interior space from the front entrance opens into a large square area with low wooden benches along the perimeter.

The back wall contains two sets of double doors, behind which is now storage/prepping area. This space was originally where visitors would rent swimming equipment and housed the changing areas for each sex. To the right and left of these doors are the current restrooms. A later addition, on the back-left section of the pavilion facing the back wall is a handicapped accessible restroom. To the left of the main structure is a low side addition, which used to serve as the concession area. The building retains a high degree of historic integrity for location, setting, design, materials, workmanship, feel and association. It has been continually used by the community for over 100 years and its historic features have been retained while also updating certain aspects of the building for modern uses. The pavilion is over 50 years old and retains much of its integrity from its construction in 1915, with some modifications and upgrades as stated above.

The gates are the next significant structure in the park and lie at the only vehicle access entrance to the park at the end of N. New Hampshire Street. Constructed in 1920 the gates were a gift to the park by Dr. Stevenson and were dedicated to his parents and the Rebel Ram Manassas, which was a submarine that served in the civil war to defend Louisiana.

Each of the two sides of the gate sit on a concrete footer. The focal points of the gate are two redbrick and mortar structures with a square concrete footer and a marble base. On the capstone are three cast iron cannon balls.

On the southern elevation of the eastern gate the plaque reads “Original Park Gates erected 1920, Restored 2007” and features a carving of the gates on the top of the plaque. The east and west elevations include a cement placeholder for the plaque.

The north elevation has a marble plaque with a carving of the Rebel Ram Manassas and reads “My Parents, Projectors of the Rebel Ram Manassas, Defender of Louisiana in The Civil War, Dr. Stevenson, 1920”. Dr. Stevenson donated the gates in 1920 in honor of his parents and the CSS Ram Manassas.

The CSS Ram Manassas was active during the Civil War as a part of the Confederate fleet. The Manassas has a unique history and was originally designed in Massachusetts as a towboat and used as a steam icebreaker. The ship was captured and purchased by Captain John Stevenson, who was the father of Dr. Stevenson. Captain Stevenson turned the icebreaker he had purchased into a ram – which is an entirely ironclad ship run by steam meant to (literally) ram other ships and to be impermeable to cannonballs.

The Ram Manassas was one of the first ironclad ships built for the Confederacy. Eventually, the ship was defeated, but its story offers a unique perspective into naval warfare during the Civil War. This history is especially relevant to the significance of this property due to its connection to the rivers.

Originally the gates had iron gates to enclose the park. These were removed with the increase in vehicle traffic to the park. Over the years, the gates were vandalized and fell into disrepair. The cannonballs were stolen and the plaques damaged. In 2007, the gates and plaques underwent restoration. The cannonballs were replaced with ones to match. The gates are contributing objects as, although they have been restored with the cannonballs replaced, they are over 50 years old and retain their historic integrity. The town appreciates and is aware of this history as was shown by the hard work that was put in to carefully restoring the gates in 2007.

Today, the park is used daily by locals and visitors alike. The pavilion is still available for private rental for celebrations and gatherings and is often booked. Town-organized events are also held in the structure, such as the philharmonic music event series and the Halloween Monster Mash.

The park is a source of joy and pride for all the residents of Covington and remains an important asset to the community. The gates to the park are also significant in and of themselves and offer a piece of history about some of the residents of the town.

The Bogue Falaya Park has served as a key recreational facility in Covington since it was first created in 1907-08.

See also:
Sign Dedication at the Park Entrance
Bogue Falaya Park Pavilion

Visit tammanyfamily.blogspot.com to see more great local history!

Local Events

Chillin’ at the River with Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours this Saturday

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Come out to one last concert of the year at the Bogue Falaya Park! The day after Christmas, Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours will perform for a free live concert on the river.

On Saturday December 26th, the City of Covington presents Grammy nominated Cameron Dupuy and the Cajun Troubadours at the Bogue Falaya Park from 4 – 6:30 pm. A continuation of the Chillin’ at the River concert series, guests are encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets, and picnics as food and beverages will not be provided. Masks are required, sanitation and social distancing circles will be available.

These concerts are put on to provide safe, family friendly entertainment with social distancing in mind. Enjoy the scenic sprawling landscape of our beautiful park while listening to local live music. Afterwards, take a stroll around downtown Covington and visit the many unique shops and fine dining restaurants.

Read more about the Cajun Troubadours here:

Live Music Local Events

Chillin’ at the River Continues with Dat Band at the Bogue Falaya Park

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Spread out and chill out to some live music – social distancing style.

For those who have made it out to any of the Chillin’ at the River concerts this fall, the Bogue Falaya Park has made a perfect setting to relax and unwind on the River while enjoying some nice local music. Guests are encouraged to bring blankets, chairs and picnics as food and drink sales are not available. These free concerts put on by the City of Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts & Events provide residents and visitors with safe, family-friendly entertainment.

Concerts are 5 – 7:30 pm at the Bogue Falaya Park, 213 Park Drive in the heart of downtown Covington. Parking is free at nearby public parking oxlots and throughout the downtown neighborhoods. Please be sure not to block driveways. After the concert, check out Covington’s eclectic shops and award-winning restaurants.

THE LINEUP:

Nov 5 – The DAT Band
Nov 12 – Boogie Falaya

All concerts are weather permitting. Follow the City of Covingon on Facebook for current info.

The City of Covington Office of Cultural Arts and Events is dedicated to providing residents and visitors with a variety of unique and exciting entertainment options. For more information, contact the City of Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts and Events at (985) 892-1873. Learn more about Covington, Louisiana history here.

Live Music Local Events

Chillin’ at the River – Free Concerts at the Bogue Falaya Park

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Spread out and chill out to some live music – social distancing style.

From Louisiana Northshore:

We’ve all missed live music this year, here in the land where jazz was born and Louisiana music is part of everyday life. To ensure live music could return this fall to the music-loving town, Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts and Events have moved the “Rockin’ the Rails” outdoor concert series from the Covington Trailhead to the open spaces of downtown Covington’s parks.

Now dubbed “Chillin at the River,” the concerts continue every Thursday through November 12th at Bogue Falaya Park, 213 Park Drive in the heart of downtown Covington–just south of historic Christ Episcopal Church on New Hampshire Street. After the concert, be sure to visit Covington’s eclectic shops and award-winning restaurants. 

THE LINEUP:

Oct 15 – The New Orleans Mystics (at Rev. Peter Atkins Park)
Oct 22 – The Iguanas
Oct 29 – John Papa Gros – Tribute to The Night Tripper, Dr. John
Nov 5 – The DAT Band
Nov 12 – Boogie Falaya

Concerts are still 5:00 – 7:30 pm and still free and open to the public. Food or drink sales may not be available; guests are welcome to bring ice chests/picnics/adult beverages if they wish. Parking is free at nearby public parking oxlots and throughout the downtown neighborhoods. Please be sure not to block driveways. 

All concerts are weather permitting. Follow the City of Covingon on Facebook for current info.

The City of Covington Office of Cultural Arts and Events is dedicated to providing residents and visitors with a variety of unique and exciting entertainment options. For more information, contact the City of Covington’s Office of Cultural Arts and Events at (985) 892-1873. Learn more about Covington, Louisiana history here.

Local Events Non Profit Spotlight

6th Annual Quack-A-Falaya Duck Race This Saturday

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The Covington Rotary Club announces their 6th Annual Quack-A-Falaya Rubber Duck Race on the Bogue Falaya this Saturday September 26th, 2020. This Celebration of Clean Water and Family Recreation was rescheduled from its traditional spring date due to COVID.

From the Covington Rotary Club:

Support the efforts of the Rotary Club of Covington by buying a duck or two! Fastest duck earns its owner $1500. We’ll also have prizes for the top 10 RUBBER DUCKS.

To ensure we keep to physical distancing protocols, we will LIVESTREAM the race on the Covington Rotary Club and Quack-A-Falaya Facebook pages. Winners will be contacted and need not be present to win.

If you would like to support the efforts of the Covington Rotary Club, you can also make a straight up donation on the eventbrite.com page. THANK YOU! Visit the Facebook pages or www.covrotary.org for more information on the efforts of Covington Rotarians. We are People of Action! Come join us!

The race begins 9 am at the Bogue Falaya Wayside Park.
Sponsor a duck for $20 here: www.eventbrite.com

Proceeds will benefit: Miracle League Northshore, Keep Covington Beautiful, the Covington Boys and Girls Club, the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, and the efforts of the Covington Rotary Foundation (501 c 3)

Local History

Covington History: Highlights of History by H.A. Mackie

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Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View his blog Tammany Family here.

H. A. Mackie of Covington wrote an interesting overview of the Historical Highlights of St. Tammany Parish, and it was published in the June 26, 1953, edition of the St. Tammany Farmer. It was also reprinted on a handout for the Covington Sesquicentennial.

Here is the text as written by H.A. Mackie.

Highlights of History of Covington and St, Tammany Parish, La.

The SETTLEMENT that was to be called Covington was originally named Wharton, located on the east bank of the Bogue Falaya river, where Claiborne now stands. The old courthouse is still there, re-modeled, as a residence. It was used only a short time as a courthouse.

The development of the settlement was rapid, especially after it was moved to the west bank of the river and the name changed from Wharton to Covington, by an act of the State Legislature, passed March 16, 1816. On April 2, 1832, a charter was granted by the State Legislature to the City of Covington.

Covington was named after a prominent citizen of the time, General Leonard Covington. One story goes that a large amount of whiskey was shipped to New Orleans from Covington, Ky., through Wharton which suggested the name. That is probably, only a fable.

High Land

Columbia Street Landing postcard

St. Tammany parish was the nearest high land to New Orleans and became the gateway to the north and a source of much needed material for building New Orleans, and other products for the city’s development.

New Orleans, being surrounded by water and marshland, the only contact with the rest of the country was by transportation on the Mississippi river and Lake Pontchartrain.

The navigable rivers in St. Tammany parish, offered a desirable means of trading merchandise for raw materials. The Little Tchefuncta, Bogue Falaya and Abita rivers, formed the Big Tchefuncta river about 20 miles from Lake Pontchartrain. The route was directly across the lake to the mouth of the Tchefuncta. Deep water at Covington, made the highland country, with its resources, accessible to New Orleans as far north as the Great Lakes.

The route into New Orleans from the lake was by the new and old canals. Both reached into the heart of the city where the produce, cotton, cattle, hides, wool, timber, charcoal, fuel, wood, naval stores, sand, brick and gravel, supplied the needs of the coming great city, New Orleans.

Tammany Materials Built New Orleans

All of the buildings in New Orleans were made from St. Tammany parish materials. To get some idea of how old Covington is, in 1803 the Louisiana Purchase took place in the Cabildo at Jackson Square. The Cabildo buildings, the St. Louis Cathedral and all surrounding structures had been built of material from St. Tammany parish, years before. The trade and traffic of which, had been handled in and around this location.

Before the saw mills were operated here, the logs from the hills of St. Tammany parish were rolled or dragged to the nearest water courses leading to the rivers, made into huge rafts and floated to the mills on the new and old canals in New Orleans, where they were cut into lumber.

The writer remembers well, the rafts of logs that filled the new canal born Claiborne to Broad street and Martin’s large saw mill at Galvez street. Sand, gravel, wood, charcoal and gravel were hauled in schooners and barges.

At first, mule teams towed the boats to the head of the canals, but later this chore was done by steam tugs. Much cotton found its way to New Orleans from St. Tammany parish.

Brickyards and Charcoal

Old-timers will remember the charcoal schooners at the head of the canals. St. Tammany charcoal and pine wood was the fuel used most in New Orleans in those days. Brick and sand made up much of the tonnage for the boats. The remains of many brick kilns may be found on the rivers in St. Tammany parish today.

After the settlement was moved to its present location, the river front at Columbia Street became the focal point of land and river traffic. Passenger and freight boats made regular trips to New Orleans, some of which were steam driven.

The country north of Covington for 100 miles was covered with virgin yellow pine, some of the finest in the world. It was government owned, but acquired by settlers through homestead rights. A settler could get title to 180 acres by cultivating and living on ten acres for a period of ten years.

Military Road

A main road was established due north through Mississippi into Tennessee, and was used by Gen. Jackson on his way from Tennessee to fight the Battle of New Orleans. He took a boat at Covington and crossed Lake Pontchartrain to get to New Orleans. The road to Covington was called Military Road, because a military post was established on the river north of Covington. It became the artery of traffic to the north, serving the settlers. from St. Tammany parish to Tennessee.

The settlers would take days, sometimes weeks, to drive their ox teams to town to trade their produce with the merchants and buy provisions to last them for months. Many farms were started along the way. Sheep and cattle business developed, lumber and naval stores operations became extensive and large mercantile houses handled a large volume of business.

A branch of the Union Bank of New Orleans was located on Rutland and New Hampshire streets, the old brick foundations are still on the spot. The manager of the bank lived in the then famous Rosedale Mansion on Portsmouth (now Wharton) and New Hampshire streets. This old mansion was burned about 1899, and the present frame structure was built about 1901.

Bank Buries Money

When the Yankee gunboats came up the river to take Covington, the banks money was hidden in a tank buried in the yard of the owner of the bank. The tank was removed in 1915 by the present owner of the property, but no money was found. If there had been any money in the tank, it would have been Confederate and worthless.

The early activities of the settlement started at Columbia street and the river and radiated out into the forests. Foot paths became wagon roads, then highways and now ribbons of concrete to all parts of the country.

The land on the river front was owned by a man named John W. Collins. On March 19, 1814, he dedicated it to the town and laid out the squares, streets and lots. The record reads, “It is humbly dedicated to the late President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, giving use of all streets, alleys, water courses, with timber thereon, as shown by plat, referred to in the body of this dedication.” After the execution of the dedication, Mr. Collins proceeded to sell the lots to interested citizens.

Ox Lots

In the squares, a 20-foot alley was cut through, with an ox lot 120 by 120 feet, in the middle to accommodate the farmers’ teams at night, to keep the oxen off the streets. This dedication by Mr. Collins, was a part of the Division of St. John.

As an illustration of how the town started to develop, the writer has titles and descriptions of property on Portsmouth street (later Independence, now Wharton), between Columbia and New Hampshire, which Includes lots 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15. The following names are recorded, as purchasers of the lots:

Alice Wilson, 1815; Samuel Murphy, 1818; Peter Quinn, 1817; James and Thomas Tate, 1817; John G. Greeves and Laurent Millandon, 1823; James McCoy and Samuel Mallory, 1825; Henry Quinn, 1835; Samuel Davis, 1835; Mrs. Mary Merritt and William Bagley, 1844; William Bagley, 1846; Rev. Victor Jouncourt, 1845 G. Price Durance, 1849; William Bagley, 1850; Mary Ann Dunnica, 1857; Archbishop A. Blanc, 1858; John Ruddock, 1867; Charles R. Bailey, 1868; Rev. Joachim Maneritta, 1870; George Ingram, 1875; Adam Thompson, 1877; Thomas Collins, 1883; James Taylor, 1884; Henry Smith, 1890; St. Peters Church, 1896; Hypolite Laroussini, 1891, H. A. Mackie, 1915.

After the Civil War the railroads came from the north to New Orleans, and commerce and river traffic to and from St. Tammany parish faded. Mercantile houses became country stores, the deep water at the foot of Columbia street filled with sand and only small boats can be accommodated now.

Boll Weevil Obliterates Cotton

The boll weevil took its toll of cotton, the timber played out, the W. P. A. ruined the farmers and with the discontinuance of passenger train service, Covington almost became a ghost town. But with its good climate, timber re-growth, pure artesian water, good drainage, beautiful trees, white sand bathing beaches, Covington has become the place of recreation and health for the people of New Orleans and other parts of the state and nation.

Money Hill Tung Oil Plantation

As business people of New Orleans retired, many established homes and beautiful estates in St. Tammany parish, creating a substantial income for the community. A network of good highways have helped the situation greatly.

Covington and surrounding area have large educational institutions, drawing students from other states and foreign countries.

The new $365,000 parish hospital will add much to the desirability of Covington as a residential city. The tung oil industry and cattle raising, have been developed on a large scale in this area.

Businesses of Covington

A naval stores plant was established in Covington in 1911 and has operated continuously since, with a considerable payroll and benefit in land clearing, pine stumps being the raw material used.

Covington Bank & Trust

There are many very old business places and residences in and around Covington, which would make good reading, if their histories were told. Few cities in America are more interesting and beautiful than Covington.

The parish has other interesting places. Slidell has large and important industries; Madisonville has its shipyards; Abita Springs and Mandeville are famous recreation and health resorts.

St. Tammany parish is a pleasant and healthful place to live in and has a most promising future. It is 68 miles by road and 35 miles by air from New Orleans.

When the Greater New Orleans Expressway is built, St. Tammany parish will be the front yard of the big southern metropolis and its most beautiful residential district.

End of Mackie article

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Local History

Covington History: Fate of Covington Founder Researched

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Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View his blog Tammany Family here.

The history books credit Jacques Dreux as the founder of the Covington area, and while much is known about where he came from and what he did while he was in western St. Tammany, the facts grow dim as to where he went after he left Covington and what he did as an encore. His fate was researched by several interested parties in the 1980’s, and the article below is the result of some of that research.

Click on the image below to see a larger version of the article.

According to the article, one hundred and ninety-four years ago, a fellow decided that western St. Tammany would be a good place for a town, situated on the crossing of a major waterway and a major land trade route from Mississippi.

1814 map of Louisiana

The land upon which the City of Covington now stands was once owned by Jacques Dreux, who came into the area and laid out the town on the west bank of the Bogue Falaya River at the head of navigation. That was probably just south of where the present downtown area is located, considered to be a “highly desirable” site due to the river access and trade route from Mississippi.

According to a St. Tammany Parish history written by Frederick Steve Ellis, Jacques Dreux first took posses­sion of his property around 1800 after receiving a 640-acre Spanish land grant. In 1813, the Dreux tract was acquired by his neighbor John Wharton Collins, who on July 4, 1913, dedicated the town of Wharton.

After that, the name of Jacques Dreux disappears from the history books and the known genealogical records as well, making him to some extent a mystery man. He was born in 1778, but where he died is unknown.

Dreux’s original name for Covington was St. James (or St. Jacques), but there was no exact location of this particular com­munity. The town was formally incorporated on March 11, 1816, by legislative act and its name changed to Covington.

In research conducted by Louis de la Vergne, a Covington area resident, the Catholic Church records are clear that, while Dreux himself did not marry and have children, 4 a number of present-day Covington area families seem co-Iaterally linked to the Dreux genealogy.

Jacques Dreux descended from Mathurin Dreux (1699-1772), his grandfather, and fam­ily names allied with the Dreux included the Saunhac du Fossat familv (which evolved into the Soniat name), the de la Vergne family line and even the Villere family name, which ties in with Covington’s former mayor Keith Villere’s genealogy.

Jacques Phillipe Villere
26th, 2nd since U.S. Statehood
Governor of Louisiana

Keith Villere’s great, great, great grandfather Jacques Phillipe Villere in 1784 married the daughter of Jean Gabriel Fazhande and Charlotte Dreux de Gentily. The Dreux family was long associated with New Orleans East and the Gentilly area.

Other modern-day family names associated with the Dreux family descendants include the Livaudais family, and the Jumonville de Villiers family, as well as the Charbonnet name, the Cartier family, the Fortier family, and the Navarre family names.

The records indicate many other family names connect to the founder of the Covington area community, including fam­ily names such as d’Estrenan de Beaupre’, as well as the histori­cally prominent de Marigny de Mandeville family name, of whom Bernard de Marigny de Mandeville laid out and estab­lished the town on the lake.

After he left Covington, Jacques Dreux may have gone, to Mobile or Pensacola, says William deMarigny Hyland, the historian of St. Bernard Parish. “His family had a tradition of following the Spanish govern­ment, and when the Spaniards retreated out of the area he may have gone with them,” Hyland said.

Jean-Bernard Xavier Philippe de Marigny de Mandeville (1785–1868)

Bernard deMarigny laid out the town of Mandeville in the late 1820’s, and he and Jacques Dreux were about the same age, according to Hyland. They undoubtedly knew each other, he said, and were members of a group of New Orleanians interested in developing the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain. “These guys all knew each other,” says de la Vergne.

“People had been settling in St.Tammany in the late 1700’s,” Hyland explained,” and they knew the Anglos were interested in building up trade with New Orleans. It was obvious even back then , that the Northshore had potential, he stated.

Check out Ron Barthet’s blog Tammany Family for more great local history!

Local History

Covington History: 1988 Historical Walking Tour

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Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View his blog Tammany Family here.

The City of Covington compiled a list of interesting buildings in the city so that visitors (or local residents) could take a walking tour that showcased the historical structures. Below is the list of buildings on the “walk through history” tour promoted during the city’s 175th anniversary in 1988, guided by the St. Tammany Historical Society, with information supplied by Todd Valois.

Walk Through The History of Covington

On July 4, 1813, John Wharton Collins, a New Orleans merchant, founded the city that became Covington on the edge of a parcel of land he owned in the fork between the Bogue Falaya and Tchefuncte Rivers. Collins laid out an unusual system of streets and squares with central lots and alleys that are popularly known as “ox lots.” Collins named the town Wharton and dedicated it to Thomas Jefferson. When the legislature chartered the town in 1816, it was renamed with Collins strong objection to honor General Leonard Covington of Natchez who distinguished himself in the War of 1812.

Two fires destroyed most buildings built before 1880. The original urban design is still visible, as are examples of late nineteenth and early twentieth century storefronts and residences. Visitors may savor the character of a small town at the turn of the century, enjoy shopping, dining and strolling under the majestic live oaks that frame many of Covington’s streetscapes.

Division of Morgan, Commerce and Virtue – Laid out in 1813 as an “Avenue” along with the Division of St. John. Based on the same plan as Canal Street in New Orleans, a tree-lined neutral ground existed down the center of the Avenue. Joseph and Alfred Theard laid out the area in lots and squares in 1879. For the most part, the lots and squares were sold as family homes. As early as 1890, several businesses were opened, establishing the area as an industrial site. In this area were the St. Tammany Ice and Manufacturing Co., the Mackie Pine Oil Plan, Covington Grocery and Grain Wholesalers and the Covington Train Depot.

Covington Cemetery – On December 27, 1817, the founder of Covington, John Wharton Collins, died at his home in New Orleans. He was buried in Covington in accordance with his final request. He was interred on the corner of Columbia and Kirkland. His widow sold the surrounding land to the city five years later for a cemetery.

The Old Railroad Depot, 503 N. New Hampshire – On May 16, 1888, the East Louisiana Railroad reached Covington, heralding an economic boom. The original depot faced New Hampshire Street with a passenger and freight terminal facing east. During the mid-1900s, the Depot was moved one block to the present site (now a restaurant).

Covington Waterworks, c. 1930, 414 N. Theard. Stucco Mission Style building with baroque style shaped gable parapets and a Spanish style roof. It is the only building of this architectural style in Covington, and is located in the Morgan, Commerce & Virtue.

Old Covington Firehouse, c. 1930, 406 N. Theard. This two-story wood frame structure was built in 1940. Living quarters were on the top story and served as home to the family who answered the phone and sounded the alarm for the 3rd Ward (Folsom, Covington and Mandeville). In 1949 the Volunteer Fire Department received a new Seagraves Fire Engine. It was housed in this building while serving the community until the early 1970s. The building is now the home of the Covington Downtown Development Commission.

C.J. Schoen Middle School, c. 1914, 300 N. Jefferson. Formerly Covington Grammar School, this structure is the oldest school building in use in the parish. The school building was on this site as early as 1909.

Commercial Hotel, Patrick Hotel and Roubion Hotel, E. Gibson. In conjunction with the railroad boom, several hotels sprang up along the track. The Commercial Hotel and Patrick Hotel on the north side of Gibson Street were built after the 1906 fire (now commerce buildings and offices).

Covington Bank & Trust Building., c. 1885, 308 N. Columbia. The Bank of Covington was established in these original quarters. It is the oldest commercial building in Covington.

H.J. Smith and Sons Hardware and Museum, c. 1876, 308 N. Columbia. Oldest hardware and general store in the parish, housing unique artifacts on the history of Covington. Of note are the dugout cypress canoe and lead coffin. H.J. Smith and Sons was founded July 4, 1876.

Abadie Family House, c. 1925, N. Lee Lane. Built by Hyacinth Louis Abadie on the old Bogue Falaya River Bridge Road, it is the site of the Louis Abadie store and bakery, c. 1885. Home remembered throughout Covington for its beautiful gardens and landscape. It remained a family home for more than 50 years until it was sold in 1981. Across the street is a mural, “Christmas in the Country,” painted by Elizabeth Bowab Joanen depicting turn of the century Victorian cottages. (1993)

Courthouse Square and Historic Oaks, 510 E. Boston. The first parish courthouse was located across the Bogue Falaya River in Claiborne. The second courthouse was erected on this site in Covington, c. 1850, to be demolished and replaced by the third courthouse, c. 1896. The fourth and present parish courthouse is graced by oaks planted more than 245 years ago, predating our street plan of 1813.

The Southern Hotel Building, c. 1907, 428 E. Boston. This building was constructed at a cost of $100,000. There were once 200 feet of galleries overlooking New Hampshire Street, a formal garden and tennis court. Tame and exotic animals resided in cages in the central lobby surrounding an artesian fountain (now parish offices).

The Bogue Falaya Mens Club, Old MCB Library, c. 1905. 131 N. New Hampshire. Constructed in 1903, the ladies of Minerva’s Chosen Band purchased this building for the town’s first lending. library in 1907.

The Christ Episcopal Chapel, 120 N. New Hampshire. Organized and founded in 1846, it is the oldest public building in use in St. Tammany Parish.

Original Gates to Bogue Falaya Park, End of N. New Hampshire. August 11, 1908, Dr. George R. Tolson sold to the town of Covington the 13 acres that make up the Bogue Falaya Park.

Patecek Building, 301 Columbia. In the early months of 1995, total restoration of this historic building began. Built shortly after the Great Fire of 1898, the building provides a beautiful example of turn of the century commercial architecture. For more than 60 years, 301 Columbia has housed retail stores and holds the distinction of its second floor being Covington’s first telephone exchange.

Covington Bank & Trust II, 236 Columbia. Originally built in 1907, it served as the second Covington Bank & Trust building. The structure also housed a drug store and attorneys’ offices on the second floor. After the bank’s closure in 1934, it housed the first chain grocery store in Covington. During the tenure of the latest owner, the tile facade was added and renovations were extended on the second floor.

Seiler Building, 434 N. Columbia. Built in the early 1900s and still known as the Seiler Building, this historic landmark once housed one of the most prominent saloons, cafe and oyster bars in St. Tammany Parish. Of note were the massive solid mahogany bars and counters throughout this fine example of turn of the century urban architecture.

Champagne Grocery, 427 N. Columbia. This beautiful structure once housed the Champagne Grocery, founded in 1919, which remained open for more than 60 years. In a time when groceries were delivered and for many years after Champagne’s was an important part of everyday life in Covington. When one thinks of the small town grocery and a distant way of life, one thinks of Champagne’s.

Old Freezer Plant, 526 N. New Hampshire. Built in 1945 as the Growers Cooperative Association and better known as the “Old Freezer Plant,” this building holds the distinction of being the first and only community freezer plant in the area. At a time when most families did not have their own freezers, this building once housed many a holiday turkey or ham. Many residents still remember picking up their store of meat from the freezer.

Columbia Street Landing, End of Columbia. The birthplace of Covington, this active harbor once docked schooners and steamers and brought many early settlers to Covington. Established in the early 1800s, it was a vital link to other river cities transporting cotton, lumber, bricks, whiskey and mail. Oyster luggers used the port to transport fresh oysters to the community through the 1930s. Today, Diamond Bullet Design, the creator of this web site, is located in the home at the street’s end, just above the landing.

Covington Ice House, 322 N. Florida. This structure was built in 1910 and served as the Covington Ice House until the 1920s when it became home to D’Aquin’s Wholesale Grain Company. Blossman Gas Company occupied the building from 1934 until it was renovated as Tyler Downtown Drugs and Cafe Cabaret.

Check out Ron Barthet’s blog Tammany Family for more great local history! More photos related to this post here.

Local Events

Sunset at the Landing this Friday

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The Sunset at the Landing Free Concert Series continues this Friday July 17th, 2020 at the Columbia Street Landing (Columbia Street at the River) from 6 – 9 p.m. This month’s concert features Dave Easely, James Singleton and Justin Peake followed by David Bandrowski and John Fohl.

Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market. Admission is free, the public is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets. For more information: 985-892-1873

Local Events

Volunteers: KCB River Sweep 2019 September 28

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Keep Covington Beautiful is sponsoring its annual Bogue Falaya River Sweep, a litter cleanup on the Bogue Falaya River, on Saturday, September 28th. 

KCB invites volunteers to bring their canoes & kayaks to the Menetre (4th Avenue) Boat Launch at 9:00 a.m.  KCB will provide trash bags, gloves & litter grabbers.  Paddlers will collect litter from the river beginning at the boat launch to the Boston Street Bridge & back to Bogue Falaya Park.  
Volunteers are needed to assist with signing in the paddlers at the boat launch, with setting up the picnic and with helping paddlers unload their catch at the park.  
Paddlers and volunteers are asked to sign up by September 23rd by contacting KCB at 985-867-3652 or info@keepcovingtonbeautiful.org.  Please indicate whether you have your own canoe/kayak or need one.  A limited number of canoes and kayaks will be available. They will be assigned as paddlers sign up.  Event day volunteers & paddlers are always welcome but canoe/kayak availability cannot be guaranteed.  
Personal flotation devices required for all paddlers.  
All volunteers will be required to sign a waiver before participating in the event.  Signature of parent or guardian is required for youth under the age of 18, or if part of a group, by the organization’s authorized adult sponsor.  Waiver form: keepcovingtonbeautiful.org. 
A picnic for volunteers and paddlers following the clean-up will be held at the small pavilion near the entrance to Bogue Falaya Park.  Prizes will be given for the largest item and the most unusual item collected.
As much as eighty percent of all litter and debris in our oceans, rivers and lakes originates on land, carried there by wind and storm water run-off.  The rivers that define the city of Covington are essential to its unique character. Join us to help keep our portion of this scenic river clean!
To become a KCB member or volunteer and to learn how to get involved with KCB’s major project, the Blue Swamp Creek Nature Trail, visit our website, www.keepcovingtonbeautiful.org.  In addition to the nature trail, Keep Covington Beautiful’s other projects include planting the downtown street-side planters, an Arbor Day celebration, educational seminars, litter prevention and recycling activities. Follow on FB.

Local History Local News Opinion

To Dredge Or Not To Dredge, What Is The Motivation?

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Historically, here in Covington, the beautiful and scenic Bogue Falaya River was dredged in order to accept larger vessels from the south shore and surrounding areas that carried passengers as well as needed goods and supplies.  The Covington Trailhead Museum features historic area photographs and a short video highlighting Covington as a thriving center of trade and tourism back to the early 1800’s, during the Revolutionary founding of this country. The Louisiana Legislature created the Louisiana Natural and Scenic Rivers System for the purpose of preserving, protecting, developing, reclaiming and enhancing the wilderness qualities, scenic beauties and ecological regimes of certain free-flowing Louisiana streams.  Forty-seven years later, that designation is in jeopardy with SB 132, the argument being that dredging the rivers will alleviate the flooding witnessed in recent years.


Based on several articles sent in by local historian Mark Johnson, it appears that previous flooding occurred even when the rivers were dredged.  If the rivers flooded even when they were dredged, why are so many politicians convinced that dredging the river will alleviate flooding?  Being that the mantra here is “development does not cause flooding”, the educated guess is that the politicians’ developer friends are putting bugs in their ears,  because rivers listed on the Louisiana Natural and Scenic Rivers System are regulated to deter major development.


The designation is a double edged sword.  Anyone that enjoys the rivers around here also knows that they could use being cleared out.  On any given stretch of river, it is not uncommon to see fallen trees, limbs, branches and other debris, all of which cannot be removed without a scenic waterways permit.  So, the river may have certain protections, but those same protections prohibit the safe access and use of said waterways.   Is this an unintended consequence of an idea with good intentions?

Newly elected Councilman At Large Patrick McMath was quoted by Fox 8 recently with regard to the issue:
“I speak for the council and the mayor when I say we don’t want to see the words ‘dredging’ and ‘clearing of the banks’ in this bill.”   Masson, May 30, 2017, fox8live.com
Considering that the bill was originally written to allow for the dredging of Baton Rouge area rivers and streams that caused flooding last year, there is a great likelihood that the word dredging will appear in the bill, despite our local politicians’ stated wishes to the contrary.  Whether or not anyone wants to see the word “dredging” in the bill is irrelevant to the fact that it is about dredging.
Voters are used to politicians distorting the truth and misrepresenting facts, but there is also the expectation that our representatives do sometimes listen to the public.
The bill’s original purpose is to dredge rivers.  Why would St. Tammany place itself on a bill concerning dredging, if St. Tammany does not intend to have the rivers dredged?  Why not just craft a new bill that allows for the removal of fallen trees, branches and debris from the river in an efficient manner consistent with preservation?
If forgetting the past ensures repeating mistakes, previous situations faced by the Parish could indicate that there is a larger picture.  During the now infamous St. Tammany Parish Hydraulic Fracturing Controversy, the former St. Tammany Parish Economic Development Director Don Shea’s statement to the council, ‘There’s nothing in the pipeline’ was very telling.  Technically, he was not lying, the pipeline was empty.   It did exist however, and Helis Oil and Gas Co. was ready to run it, before the public even knew who they were, or what they were doing here.
At one Parish Council meeting, a parish attorney berated a member of the public for suggesting that the St. Tammany Parish School Board had any involvement in Helis Oil’s plans for a hydraulic fracturing platform near Lakeshore High School. Interestingly, certain documents with regard to the St. Tammany Parish School Board and the Mineral Rights involving Lakeshore High School property surfaced, suggesting that the School Board may have benefited from a hydraulic fracturing operation located right across the highway from the school in question after all.
Therefore, a healthy degree of skepticism should be a welcome thing in situations that have a high profile, affect large numbers of people and cost a lot of taxpayer dollars.   In conclusion, this article is not intended to make an argument for dredging or against dredging, and there are many pros and cons to both.  The question this article is concerned with is why the politicians believe dredging the river will alleviate the flooding, when historically, the river flooded even when it was dredged.  If the past is any indication, the stated purpose of a particular thing (in this case, SB 132) is merely a consequence of the actuality.

 

Local Events

Jolly Roger Paddler’s Club River Clean Up

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jolly roger-page-001The Jolly Roger Paddler’s Club is a kayak and canoe paddling club based in Covington, established for all who enjoy the rivers for recreational use.  Find information about events on their Facebook page.  This Saturday, the Paddler’s Club is organizing a river clean up for paddlers  who are interested in participating.  The Club is meeting at Old Landing at 9 a.m. to clean up the Bogue Falaya River.  Bring your Canoe or Kayak and paddle, plus a couple of trash bags.  It is always a good idea to wear a life jacket as well.  For those that do not have a water vessel, Brooks’ Bike Shop on the trace has a limited number of kayaks available to rent.  Call Brooks at 985-237-3658.

 

Brooks’ Bike Shop in downtown is also home to the Covington Bicycle Club.  Find them on Facebook to keep up with rides and events!

Local Events Local News

Sunset At The Landing Concert Series Continues This Friday

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Sunset at the Landing is brought to you by the City of Covington, Heritage Bank of St. Tammany and the Covington Farmer’s Market. Enjoy a free concert at the Columbia Street Landing, one of the most historic points in downtown Covington. Bring a chair, blanket & picnic, enjoy the show!

Sunset at the Landing

Sunset at the Landing

Healthy Living Local Events Local News Non Profit Spotlight

Annual Bogue Falaya River Sweep Trash Collection Event This Saturday

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kcbriversweepKeep Covington Beautiful is sponsoring its annual Bogue Falaya River Sweep, a litter clean-up on the Bogue Falaya River, on Saturday, September 19th. KCB will partner with the City of Covington and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation’s Beach Sweep. This event is held in conjunction with the International Coastal Cleanup sponsored by the Ocean Conservancy.

KCB invites volunteers to bring their canoes & kayaks to the Menetre (4th Avenue) Boat Launch at 8:00 a.m. KCB will provide trash bags, gloves & litter grabbers. Paddlers will collect litter in & along the river from the boat launch to the Boston Street Bridge & back. Personal flotation devices are required for all paddlers. All volunteers will be required to sign a waiver before participating in the event. Signature of parent or guardian is required for youth under the age of 18, or if part of a group, by the organization’s authorized adult sponsor.

Volunteers will also pick up litter at the boat launch and other locations where litter accumulates or enters the river, ending at Bogue Falaya Park. Volunteers are needed to assist with signing in the volunteers at the boat launch, with setting up the picnic and with helping paddlers unload their catch at the park.

Paddlers and volunteers interested in helping with the clean-up are asked to sign up by September 14th by contacting KCB at 985-867-3652 or email to keepcovbeautiful@gmail.com. A limited number of canoes and kayaks will be available. They will be assigned as paddlers sign up. Event day volunteers & paddlers are always welcome but canoe/kayak availability cannot be guaranteed. Free Beach Sweep event t-shirts will be available in various sizes for the first (50) volunteers to sign in at the event. All volunteers and paddlers are invited to a picnic at Bogue Falaya Park small pavilion following the clean-up. Prizes will be given for the largest item and the most unusual item collected on the river.

kcb river sweep

As much as eighty percent of all litter and debris in our oceans, rivers and lakes originates on land, carried there by wind and storm water run-off. The rivers that define the city of Covington are essential to its unique character. Join us to help keep our portion of this scenic river clean!

To become a member or volunteer and to learn how to get involved with KCB’s major project, the Blue Swamp Creek Nature Trail, located at the Covington Recreation Complex, visit keepcovingtonbeautiful.org. In addition to the nature trail, Keep Covington Beautiful’s other projects include planting the downtown street-side planters, an Arbor Day tree give-away, educational seminars, litter prevention and recycling activities. www.keepcovingtonbeautiful.org