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City Updates Local News

City of Covington Cyber Attack Update

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The following are updates from the City of Covington Facebook page about the recent cyber attack on the city’s server. Sign up to receive updates from the city at www.covla.com

Monday March 15, 2021

The Louisiana National Guard Cyber Restoration Unit worked continuously over the weekend with City Information Technology (IT) personnel. There remains no timeline for system functionality. I am pleased to report that one member of the Guard shared that the City of Covington IT team is “one of top three we have ever worked with.” That’s nice … congratulations to IT Director Quenton Belanger, Police Chief Deputy Trey Mahon and IT-Man Aaron Hebert.

Police, Fire, Public Works, Cultural Arts and Events, Parks and Recreation and Facilities are all fully deployed and operational. Utility Billing and Finance (computer-based functions) remain severely hampered.

Continue to use 911 for all emergencies. Text CPDLA, space, then your message to 847411 for police non-emergencies. In a practical sense, this has permanently replaced calling 892-8500.

Last week’s hack was one of perhaps 30,000 that occurred. More details are available at CBS News Report “Microsoft Hack” https://www.cbsnews.com/…/microsoft-exchange-server…/

Importance of Two-Factor Authentication: Lately we see more and more businesses asking us (as individuals) for two-factor authentication i.e. “text a code to your phone.” Regardless of this particular breach of security, one may now presume the bad guys have your personal information. It is just a matter of time before they make a play on your assets. The two-factor authentication is an important way to prevent them from using your information. -MMJ

March 12, 2021

Yesterday morning around 7:00am we discovered a significant hack into the City of Covington’s computer systems. All systems were locked down including Police, Fire, Public Works, Utility Billing and Finance.

By 11:00am yesterday the State Cyber Security Alliance was on site investigating and securing our systems. The Alliance consists of experts from the State Department of Homeland Security, LA State Police Department and New Orleans Field Office of the Secret Service. They were at City Hall in less than 240 minutes. Pretty impressive.

This morning members of the LA National Guard Cyber Restoration Team began arriving. They are working to get the City back up and running.

The Team’s priorities are first responders, utility billing and then key administrative functions.Regarding retrieval of information, we are currently in the process of diagnostics. We cannot offer an opinion on what was taken or is recoverable until we have a proper diagnosis.

At this point we can speculate it will be a week or so before we have basic operational functions.

The cyber security team has shared we are one victim of tens of thousands in America in this current wave of breaches … the bad guys found a vulnerability in a Microsoft program. – MMJ

Sign up for updates from the City of Covington www.covla.com or follow them on Facebook.

Quote & Word of the Week Word of the Week

Word of the Week

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circumlocution

noun \ser-kum-loh-KYOO-shun\

1 : the use of an unnecessarily large number of words to express an idea
2 : evasion in speech

Did You Know?

In The King’s English, grammarian H. W. Fowler advised, “Prefer the single word to the circumlocution.” Alas, that good advice was not followed by the framers of circumlocution. They actually used two terms in forming that word for unnecessarily verbose prose or speech. But their choices were apt; circumlocution derives from the Latin circum-, meaning “around,” and locutio, meaning “speech”—so it literally means “roundabout speech.” Since at least the early 16th century, English writers have used circumlocution with disdain, naming a thing to stop, or better yet, to avoid altogether. Charles Dickens even used it to satirize political runarounds in the 1857 novel Little Dorrit with the creation of the fictional Circumlocution Office, a government department that delayed the dissemination of information and just about everything else. From www.merriam-webster.com

Quote & Word of the Week Quote of the Week

Quote of the Week

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“If you want your children to listen, try talking softly to someone else.” – Ann Landers

Ann Landers was a pen name created by Chicago Sun-Times advice columnist Ruth Crowley in 1943 and taken over by Esther Pauline “Eppie” Lederer (July 4, 1918 – June 22, 2002) in 1955. For 56 years, the Ask Ann Landers syndicated advice column was a regular feature in many newspapers across North America. Owing to this popularity, “Ann Landers”, though fictional, became something of a national institution and cultural icon.

The creator of the “Ann Landers” pseudonym was Ruth Crowley, a Chicago nurse who had been writing a child-care column for the Sun since 1941. She chose the pseudonym at random—borrowing the surname ‘Landers’ from a family friend—to prevent confusion between her two columns. Unlike her eventual successor Esther Lederer, Crowley kept her identity as Landers secret, even enjoining her children to help her keep it quiet. Crowley took a three-year break from writing the column from 1948 until 1951. After 1951, she continued the column for the Chicago Sun-Times and in syndication (since 1951) to 26 other newspapers until her death, aged 48, on July 20, 1955. Crowley spent a total of nine years writing advice as “Ann Landers”. She also was featured on the 1953-1955 DuMont Television Network series All About Baby. From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ask_Ann_Landers

Non Profit Spotlight

YSB Crossroads & The Louisiana Bar Foundation: Tackling Juvenile Delinquency Together

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From the Youth Service Bureau:

Helping non-violent juvenile offenders turn their lives around is one of Youth Service Bureau’s main missions. YSB carries out this important work through Crossroads, our juvenile delinquency intervention program.

YSB Crossroads helps youth restore their relationship with the community through restitution to victims, community service, anger management counseling, Internet safety education, parenting education for their parents or legal guardians and – thanks to the Louisana Bar Foundation – Law Related Education.

Supported by a generous grant from the Louisiana Bar Foundation, Law Related Education puts juvenile offenders on a more positive track through better understanding of the law, legal system, and consequences of crime. Aimed at 10- to 16-year-olds who have committed non-violent offenses such as shoplifting, vandalism and others, these classes help juvenile offenders take responsibility for their actions and make better decisions.

Law Related Education incorporates classroom lectures, role-playing and testing. Juvenile offenders learn the legal definitions and potential sentences associated with assault, battery, vandalism, burglary, robbery, theft, drug possession, cyberbullying, cyberstalking and other offenses. Louisiana Bar Foundation funding enables YSB Crossroads to staff and administer the program and work closely with clients to improve their outcomes. YSB Crossroads is fortunate to have local attorneys teaching our Law Related Education classes – Shannon Christian (at our Slidell location) and Veronica Kittok (Covington location).

An eye-opening segment of the course is “No Kinda Life,” a video filmed at the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola and the Louisiana Correctional Institute for Women in St. Gabriel. “No Kinda Life” presents an unflinching picture of prison life, with inmates explaining how they became incarcerated and losses they suffered due to poor choices, including drug and alcohol use. The video is a powerful springboard for meaningful class discussion and group participation.

Together, the Louisiana Bar Foundation and YSB Crossroads are changing lives.

In the last fiscal year:

  • 97.7% of YSB Crossroads clients completed their community service
  • 96% successfully completed the YSB Crossroads program
  • 99.5% of those completing the program had not re-offended six months later

YSB Crossroads is deeply grateful to the Louisiana Bar Foundation for making this life-changing resource available to our community. The Louisiana Bar Foundation exists to preserve, honor, and improve our system of justice. YSB is humbled and excited to be a partner in that vital mission.

Visit Youth Service Bureau to find out more about what we do!

Click here to learn more about the Louisiana Bar Foundation.

Parish News

Parish President Mike Cooper Reflects on the One-Year Anniversary of COVID-19 Impacting St. Tammany

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From St. Tammany Parish President Mike Cooper:

“One year ago, St. Tammany, like much of the rest of the world, was faced with the reality of COVID-19. We came together as community and faced the uncertainty of a novel virus, loss of lives to this disease, and sacrifices we all had to make in order to protect the most vulnerable among us, as well as our frontline healthcare professionals. We did this to balance the health of our community with the health of our economy,” said Mike Cooper, St. Tammany Parish President.

President Cooper went on to say, “I am thankful and proud of the way we worked together and I am proud of where we now stand. Let’s continue to move forward by making individual choices to protect one another, and by utilizing the vaccine to protect ourselves as we mourn the lives of those we lost to this disease, celebrate those who have recovered, and thank the people who lovingly cared for them all.”

Watch the March 13, 2020 Press Conference

Local History

Local History: The First Theaters In West St. Tammany

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Covington History segment provided by local historical writer Ron Barthet. View Ron’s blog Tammany Family here.

Plays and performances have always been a part of the west St. Tammany scene, with productions put on at the park pavilion and even in tents on vacant lots. According to a historical plaque in downtown Covington, a “five cent show or electric theater was well patronized” as early as July of 1907, and later, in May of 1908, there were two moving picture theaters downtown, The Covington Electric Theater and the New Rink Electric Theater, which billed itself as the largest moving picture theater outside New Orleans.

Victor Frederick soon opened the Air Dome, a 500 seat theater on Boston Street across from the Southern Hotel, and in September, 1912, a Mr. Ulmer opened the New Covington Theater on New Hampshire Street in the Warren Building opposite the train depot, the historical plaque goes on to report.

In the September 20, 1913, edition of the St. Tammany Farmer it was announced that a new theater was to be built on the corner of New Hampshire and Boston Streets on the Wehrli lot, opposite the St. Tammany Bank building and across from the old parish courthouse. It was going to be first class in every respect, according to the article.

Mr. C.E. Schonberg and Robt. L. Aubert constructed the new theater building from “modern plans” up-to-date in its furnishings and state-of-the-art equipment with “every convenience for the patrons.” The theater was to be fitted with regular opera chairs, with the regulation incline that “will give every one an unobstructed view of the pictures and stage,” the article stated.

The first week’s entertainment had already been scheduled with the film company. According to the news article, the theater was leased to Charles Sidney August Fuhrmann and Ed Barrenger who had purchased the latest improved Edison picture machine to show silent movies. 

click to view larger

A contest was held for the naming of the new picture show, with the winner getting a season pass and a $5 gold piece. Suggestions were mailed to Fuhrmann, with the suggested names judged by a panel of three persons. The name of the successful contestant was   Mrs. Edmund B. Stern who had submitted the winning name “Parkview,” and the judges included Judge Joseph B. Lancaster, D. J. Sanders, and D.H. Mason.

On opening night at the Parkview, the house was packed. Fuhrmann was given a round of applause after he presented to the gathered dignitaries the following remarks: 

“Ladies and gentlemen, as manager of this theater, I wish to thank you one and all, for your attendance to-night to witness our initial performance, which I trust you have appreciated. It is needless for me to say that we have spared no efforts to give you one of the most up-to-date and modern moving picture theaters that will be found in the parish of St Tammany. 

“We shall at all times endeavor to maintain perfect order and absolute cleanliness. We also wish to assure the public that smoking in the audience and spitting on the floors will positively be prohibited, that is, to the best of our ability. Only licensed films will be shown on our canvas and these will be of a strictly high class and moral nature. We will present a complete change in program each night and will operate regardless of weather conditions.

“Any organization or club desiring the use of our theater for a benefit entertainment,  we will be more than glad to quote such parties special prices on application.”

Fuhrmann’s plans included making the facility more of a “theater of the performing arts,” spotlighting not only professional entertainers who had been brought in from New Orleans, but also local talent. It was also used for lectures and educational presentations.

Performers who took the stage at the Parkview included poetry readers, pianists,  violinists, singers, and magicians. In addition to being a multi-talented showman, Fuhrmann also wrote skits and plays that were staged there.

He was considered a one-man chamber of commerce for St. Tammany Parish, with noted success in theater, baseball and art. In addition to being a theater operator, he managed a tri-state baseball team called the Majestics. He believed that every good town needed a good baseball team.

He welcomed local civic groups to use the Parkview to promote special causes and fund-raising events. In December of 1916, the Fire Department helped sell tickets to shows at the Parkview Theater for the benefit of raising funds for new equipment.  The fire department agreed to the purchase of 1000 adult tickets at five cents each and 500 children’s tickets at 2 and a half cents each. The Covington Fire Association would then sell the tickets for five and ten cents each.

In 1917, the looming threat of war chilled the local economy and there was some thought the theater would have to close. But the editor of the St. Tammany Farmer newspaper fought for the continued operation of the Parkview, giving his reasons in an editorial on May 26 .(Click on image below)

Meanwhile, over in Abita Springs, the Airdome of Abita Springs was offering dances and moving pictures to that community. An April 7, 1917, article in the Farmer stated that the Abita Airdome would be a place of amusement that will prove attractive to a large number of people. “The film service will be excellent and every effort will be made to please the patrons,” the article said. The theater had been remodeled and improved, and an Easter dance was being planned, along with a five-reel moving picture called “The Golden Claw.”

A two-reel Keystone comedy was also on the agenda. Included in the night’s entertainment would be a band from New Orleans providing music.

Admission to the Abita theater show was ten cents for children and 15 cents for adults. Attending the dance cost extra.

From August of 1920

Meanwhile, down in Mandeville, the Hip Theater was gaining the attention of the community. 

By 1926, the Parkview had become inadequate to handle the crowds at many of the entertainments, so something had to be done. A group of businessmen in Covington decided they needed a bigger, newer motion picture theater, and that led to the building of the Majestic Theater, located on New Hampshire Street, half a block south of Boston Street. Fuhrmann painted murals on all the interior walls of the Majestic, scenes from St. Tammany Parish, trees draped with moss, moonlight on the waterways, etc. Theater patrons marvelled at his artistic ability.

The opening of the new theater was a grand event, attended by hundreds of people, surrounded by 300 automobiles.

The entrance to the Majestic Theater in 1940. Photo submitted by Mike Pittman, Remember Covington The Way It Was Facebook Page.

The Majestic Theater

And today…

The building which once housed The Majestic Theater

The building which once housed The Majestic Theater
The Majestic was home to not only the latest motion picture releases, but it continued the Parkview tradition of vaudeville, talent nights, and dance revues by local dance schools. 

Fuhrmann believed that the local theater should be used as a “springboard” for local talent, which should be encouraged and given a stage upon which to perform.

To keep interest up and let people know of coming events at the Majestic, he and his daughter would ride around town in a sound truck, broadcasting the latest about what was coming to the theater. 

Longtime Covington resident Norma Core recalled the days of the Parkview Theater and the Majestics grand opening in this late 1970’s interview with Bryan Ireland:

 In the late 1930’s another theater was opened by Fuhrmann, this being the “Deluxe,” located on New Hampshire Street, just north of Gibson Street. 

The Deluxe was plush, elegant and well-appointed, showing the latest Hollywood blockbusters and MGM musicals as well as new Technicolor films. One of the biggest showings was that of “Gone With The Wind.” 

The building that housed the Deluxe Theater

Pat Clanton, Fuhrmann’s daughter, remembers as a young girl she and her friends dressing up in Antebellum costumes and serving as ushers for the showings. “People were excited about going out to see Gone With The Wind,” she said. “They talked about it for weeks before it came. It was really special.”

Movies usually only played for two or three nights, but “Gone With The Wind” played for an entire week, with tickets being sold with assigned seat numbers printed on each one. 

In addition to his Covington shows, Fuhrmann also operated theaters south of Covington, the Madison in Madisonville, and the Lake Theater on the Mandeville lakefront at Girod Street. They continued to run for years through World War II. 

Charles Sidney August Fuhrmann

Pictured on an outing in September of 1912 are from left to right, H. K. “Nat” Goodwyn, former editor of the Farmer, Sidney Fuhrmann, Margaret Howell, Alton (Buck) Smith, Maizie Howell, Burton White and Clara Faulk. 

Furhmann died in 1963, and years later he was honored by the City of Covington with the main auditorium at the Greater Covington Center being named after him. That facility on Jefferson Avenue is also a center for the performing arts, as well as the city’s administrative offices.

See also: The Park Drive In Theater

Non Profit Spotlight

Northshore Food Bank Shares Impacts from 2020 Pandemic

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Last week, Northshore Food Bank shared some of the impacts the COVID-19 pandemic had on the organization and the community. The Food Bank also opened a new, expanded Resale Shop last year, a place to sell donated housewares, clothing and other items with proceeds benefiting the Food Bank. A survey aimed to gather feedback from the public on the new Resale Shop can be found here. The survey can be taken even if you have not visited the shop yet!

From Northshore Food Bank:

2020 was an unprecedented year in so many ways. This week we will share some of the numbers that demonstrate not only the increased need for food on the Northshore, but also how our community has supported us to ensure families in need are fed.

  • At the beginning of the pandemic, we recognized the need for additional food for kids when the schools closed early. Emergency kid packs were distributed from March until school started again in the fall, and again over the winter holiday break.
  • Through our Community Cupboard we have expanded our reach, providing food assistance to households that cannot come to us.
  • For the first time ever, we distributed enough food to provide over 1 Million Meals in one year.
  • By the end of September, we had already reached the one million pounds benchmark; this is a volume we might typically reach by the end of the year or fall just under it.

Did you know that by shopping and donating to our Resale Shop that you help feed families on the Northshore? All net proceeds directly go to operating the food bank.

We would love your thoughts on our Resale Shop. Your input could help feed even more families on the Northshore. Take our brief survey: http://bit.ly/3b8PqT7

Learn more at northshorefoodbank.org

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Quote & Word of the Week Quote of the Week

Quote of the Week

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“Never give up on something that you can’t go a day without thinking about.” – Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, DL, FRS, RA (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, statesman, army officer, and writer. He was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, during the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955. Apart from two years between 1922 and 1924, Churchill was a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1900 to 1964 and represented a total of five constituencies. Ideologically an economic liberal and imperialist, he was for most of his career a member of the Conservative Party, as leader from 1940 to 1955. He was a member of the Liberal Party from 1904 to 1924.

Of mixed English and American parentage, Churchill was born in Oxfordshire to a wealthy, aristocratic family. He joined the British Army in 1895 and saw action in British India, the Anglo-Sudan War, and the Second Boer War, gaining fame as a war correspondent and writing books about his campaigns. Elected a Conservative MP in 1900, he defected to the Liberals in 1904. In H. H. Asquith’s Liberal government, Churchill served as President of the Board of Trade and Home Secretary, championing prison reform and workers’ social security. As First Lord of the Admiralty during the First World War, he oversaw the Gallipoli Campaign but, after it proved a disaster, he was demoted to Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. He resigned in November 1915 and joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers on the Western Front for six months. In 1917, he returned to government under David Lloyd George and served successively as Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State for War, Secretary of State for Air, and Secretary of State for the Colonies, overseeing the Anglo-Irish Treaty and British foreign policy in the Middle East. After two years out of Parliament, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Stanley Baldwin’s Conservative government, returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure and depressing the UK economy. From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winston_Churchill

Quote & Word of the Week Word of the Week

Word of the Week

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prothalamion

noun \proh-thuh-LAY-mee-un\

: a song in celebration of a marriage

Did You Know?

In 1595, the newly-wed Edmund Spenser wrote a poem to his young bride. He gave this poem the title Epithalamion, borrowing a Greek word for a song or poem in honor of a bride and bridegroom. Epithalamion, which eventually became established as an English word, can be traced to Greek words that mean “upon the bridal chamber.” A year later, Spencer was inspired to write another nuptial poem—this time in celebration of the marriages of the Earl of Worcester’s two daughters. But since the ceremonies had not yet taken place, he did not want to call it an epithalamion. After some reflection, Spencer decided to separate epi- from thalamion and wed the latter with pro- (“before”), inventing a word that would become established in the language with the meaning “a song in celebration of a marriage.” From www.merriam-webster.com

Local News Parish News

St. Tammany Parish Moves into Phase III — St. Tammany Rental Assistance Program Update

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From St. Tammany Parish Government:

St. Tammany Parish President Mike Cooper announced today that St. Tammany Parish is now in Phase III.

“Simply by doing their part, our citizenry directly contributed to our movement into Phase III, as we saw a sustained decrease in positive cases and hospitalizations. We want to see this trend continue through perseverance in taking personal responsibility, wearing a mask, social distancing and staying home when feeling ill. If you are eligible for the vaccine and wish to receive it, please get it at the first opportunity,” President Cooper said.

In Phase III, the majority of businesses, including restaurants and salons, will be able to open at 75 percent of their capacity; indoor gatherings and event centers will be capped at 50 percent of their capacity but limited to 250 people; religious services will no longer have capacity limits; social distancing is strongly encouraged and masking will still be required; and bars in all parishes will be able to open for indoor service at 25 percent capacity, not to exceed 250 people. Bars in parishes where the percent positivity is 5 percent or lower for two consecutive weeks may have indoor service at 50 percent capacity, not to exceed 250 people. St. Tammany’s percent positivity is currently 6.90, according to numbers released Wednesday, March 2, 2021, from the Louisiana Department of Health. Complete details of the Executive Order with can be found at this: www.stpgov.org/covid19-declarations.

St. Tammany Rental Assistance Program or STRAP Update

The St. Tammany Rental Assistance Program (STRAP) which will utilize CARES Act funding from the Department of Treasury, is mobilizing. This assistance is available to assist households that are unable to pay rent and utilities due to the COVID-19 pandemic. St. Tammany Parish Government estimates fully implementing the program and scheduling appointments in the beginning of April 2021.

“We know that our citizens need this funding, and we are moving forward to put all of the components in place to roll out our program to make it available to them. We feel it is important for the public to be aware of our progress and have an avenue to pose questions,” President Cooper said. “When the final details are complete and we begin to accept applications, we will make a public announcement.”

Rental assistance provided to an eligible household must not be duplicative of any other federally funded rental assistance provided to such household. Beginning in early April, 2021, the St. Tammany Rental Assistance Program (STRAP) will begin accepting applications for the following households:

  • Households with an income at or below 80 percent of the area median income (AMI)
  • Households that have experienced a reduction in household income, incurred significant costs, or experienced a financial hardship due to COVID-19
  • And households that are at risk of experiencing homelessness or housing instability

Support documentation will be required prior to issuance of payments.

In early April, there will be two locations for assistance: one on Koop Drive in Mandeville and one in Slidell at the Towers building. Neither location is open yet; however, information on this program can be found at: www.stpgov.org/departments/grants. Applicants who have questions should contact the Department of Grants by email at:  STRAP@stpgov.org.

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Local News

Louisiana Moves to Phase 3 COVID Restrictions

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From the Louisiana Governor’s Office, March 2, 2021:

After Weeks of Improvement in COVID Hospitalizations and Case Counts, Louisiana Will Move to Phase 3, Statewide Mask Mandate Will Continue

Following almost six weeks of improvements in Louisiana’s COVID case counts and a sustained decrease in COVID-related hospitalizations, Gov. John Bel Edwards announced today that Louisiana will move forward to Phase 3.  This will bring most COVID restrictions back to where they were last September. Louisiana’s statewide mask mandate, which has been in place since last July, will remain in place. The Governor’s new order will last for 28 days and will expire March 31, 2021.

Overall, Louisiana’s percent positivity for COVID-19 tests is 5 percent, one third of the positivity rate six weeks ago. The state has completed more than 6 million COVID tests and administered more than 1 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccines.

“Since we stepped back into more increased restrictions more than three months ago, the goal has been to slow the spread and avoid overwhelming our hospitals, which we have done thanks to the hard work of many Louisianans,” Gov. Edwards said. “These Phase 3 restrictions will keep some common sense and lifesaving limitations in place while we work to continue keeping the case counts down and administering the vaccines to as many Louisianans as quickly as we can.

“As we are cautiously reducing some of the restrictions related to slowing the spread of COVID, it is even more critical that people take the necessary precautions to protect themselves and those around them. This includes wearing face masks, practicing social distancing, washing their hands frequently, staying home when they are sick or have been exposed and getting the vaccine when it is their turn. The last several weeks have been full of hopeful milestones, including a third COVID vaccine and the state administering more than one million doses. But we also know that COVID variants, which we know are more contagious, are active in Louisiana. In nearly a year of battling this pandemic, we have lost almost 10,000 of our fellow Louisianans, and many people have suffered greatly. It is incumbent upon all of us to do our part to help put this pandemic behind us and save lives.”

The majority of businesses, including restaurants and salons, will be able to move to 75 percent of their capacity and indoor gatherings and event centers will be capped at 50 percent of their capacity but limited to 250 people. Religious services will no longer have capacity limits, social distancing is strongly encouraged and masking will still be required.

Gyms and fitness centers will remain at 50 percent of their capacity, based on recent research from the CDC that raises concern about the spread of COVID-19 in these settings. Bars in all parishes will be able to open for indoor service at 25 percent capacity, not to exceed 250 people, but those in parishes where the percent positivity is 5 percent or lower for two consecutive weeks may have indoor service at 50 percent capacity, not to exceed 250 people. Alcohol sales still must end at 11 p.m. and no one younger than 21 years old can enter a bar.  Patrons must be masked at all times except when consuming food or drink, and they must be served at socially distanced tables.

Live music will be allowed indoors under additional guidance provided by the State Fire Marshal. Indoor gatherings may operate at 50 percent capacity with a cap of 250 people. Outdoor events may operate at 50 percent of their capacity, with no cap on attendance, but six feet of social distancing must be practiced. Conventions, conferences, indoor sporting events and fairs and festivals may operate at up to 50 percent capacity with six feet of social distancing required, if they receive approval from the State Fire Marshal and the Louisiana Department of Health.  Strict masking continues to be required for all gatherings and events.

  • Click here to read the Governor’s new Phase 3 order.
  • Click here to review the data about COVID incidence statewide.
  • Click here to view the new Phase 3 guidance on OpenSafely.la.gov.
As of March 1st, 2021 from the Louisiana Governor Facebook page
Local Events

AAUW Northshore Sponsors Civic Education Program to Discuss US Foreign Policy

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From the American Association of University Women Northshore: AAUW Sponsoring ‘Great Decisions’ for the 48th Year

The Northshore branch (formerly Covington-Mandeville) of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) is again sponsoring the Great Decisions program, an offering of the Foreign Policy Association, as a community outreach. Great Decisions, the centerpiece of the longest-running civic education program in the United States devoted to foreign affairs, empowers readers to discuss global issues shaping U.S. foreign policy and the world. Our AAUW branch offers two sessions: afternoon and evening.

Published annually by the Foreign Policy Association, the Great Decisions briefing book features impartial, thought-provoking analyses on eight issues of concern to U.S. policymakers today; these articles form a starting point for all group discussions. The purchase of the briefing book is required for participation. The 2021 edition features eight topics: Global Supply Chains, Persian Gulf Security, Brexit and the EU, The Arctic, China in Africa, The Two Koreas, Role of the WHO, and End of Globalization?

The briefing book provides historical background, current U.S. policy and alternative policy options, informative maps and detailed graphs, as well as suggested readings and resources for each topic. Included in this briefing book is an opinion poll, the results of which will be tabulated and presented in the National Opinion Ballot Report, a representative survey of readers’ views on the eight Great Decisions topics. This report is made available to members of Congress, the White House, the media, and concerned citizens.

The Northshore branch has the longest running association, as a branch of AAUW, with the Great Decisions program in the nation, having offered this program as a community outreach since 1973.

We offer two sessions of the discussions; both are open to the public, with the purchase of the briefing book. The afternoon group will meet in the Fellowship Hall of the Madisonville Presbyterian Church (701 Pine St., Madisonville) beginning at 1:00 PM starting Monday, March 8th in person with social distancing and masks. The evening session will be held virtually beginning Thursday, March 18th at 6:30pm.

The cost to participate is $28 which covers the cost of the briefing book with our bulk purchase discount. There are limited additional books available at the discounted price; additional books can be ordered from the Foreign Policy Association for $32 + shipping costs. An e-version for Kindle, Nook, etc. is also available for private purchase. Anyone who is interested in participating should contact Eileen deHaro at 985-624-9553; please specify whether you are interested in attending the afternoon or the evening session. If using an e-book you MUST still register as participating, especially for the evening session where access is by Google Meet invite only!

The American Association of University Women, with its nationwide network of more than 100,000 members, 1,300 branches, and 550 college and university partners, has been a leading advocate for equity and education for women and girls since 1881. For more information about the Northshore branch of AAUW, contact Eileen deHaro at 624-9553 or visit our website at https://www.northshore-la.aauw.net/.

Quote & Word of the Week Word of the Week

Word of the Week

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voracious

adjective \vaw-RAY-shus\

1 : having a huge appetite : ravenous

2 : excessively eager : insatiable

Did You Know?

Voracious is one of several English words that derive from the Latin verb vorare, which means “to eat greedily” or “to devour.” Vorare is also an ancestor of devour and of the -ivorous words, which describe the diets of various animals. These include carnivorous (“meat-eating”), herbivorous (“plant-eating”), omnivorous (“feeding on both animals and plants”), frugivorous (“fruit-eating”), graminivorous (“feeding on grass”), and piscivorous (“fish-eating”). From www.merriam-webster.com

Quote & Word of the Week Quote of the Week

Quote of the Week

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“There is no instinct like that of the heart.” – Lord Byron

George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, FRS (22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), known simply as Lord Byron, was an English peer, who was a poet and politician. He was one of the leading figures of the Romantic movement and is regarded as one of the greatest English poets. He remains widely read and influential. Among his best-known works are the lengthy narrative poems Don Juan and Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage; many of his shorter lyrics in Hebrew Melodies also became popular.

He traveled extensively across Europe, especially in Italy, where he lived for seven years in the cities of Venice, Ravenna, and Pisa. During his stay in Italy he frequently visited his friend and fellow poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Later in life Byron joined the Greek War of Independence fighting the Ottoman Empire and died of disease leading a campaign during that war, for which Greeks revere him as a national hero. He died in 1824 at the age of 36 from a fever contracted after the First and Second Siege of Missolonghi.

Read more here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Byron

Farmers Market Recipes

Farmers Market Recipe – Daikon & Sweet Potato Soup PLUS Honey Lime Vinaigrette

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Seasonal recipes inspired by fresh ingredients found at the Covington Farmers’ Market, by Chelsea Cochrane

Why Eat Daikons? Daikon is a winter radish variety resembling a large white carrot. Its flavor is described as mild compared to other radish varieties – crisp, slightly sweet and spicy. The daikon pairs excellently with Asian root spices like ginger and turmeric, and other vegetables of the season such as sweet potatoes, carrots and kale in stir frys and soups. Daikons are especially high in vitamin C, essential to a healthy immune system. It’s also an excellent source of folate, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and copper. Best of all, daikon radishes are in season and available at our local Farmers Market!

Daikon radishes and fresh turmeric root from Sam’s Sprouts at the Covington Farmers Market

Tip: Save the greens! Daikon radish greens have a slight bitterness and spiciness that resembles mustard greens. Save them to use in soups, stir frys and smothered greens!

Daikon Radish & Sweet Potato Veggie Soup

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium daikon radishes, sliced in half-moons
  • 1 medium sweet potato, cubed
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 3 green onions, chopped
  • 2-4 cloves of garlic
  • 1 cup purple cabbage, chopped
  • 2 Tbs fresh turmeric, minced (optional)
  • 2 Tbs fresh ginger, minced (optional)
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 4 cups vegetable broth, 2 cups water
  • 2 cups chopped kale
  • 1 Tbs rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tsp soy sauce or liquid aminos
  • shredded amethyst basil (garnish)

Cooking Instructions:

  1. Sautee veggies in large soup pot with turmeric, ginger and spices.
  2. Once veggies are tender and fragrant, add broth and water.
  3. Bring to boil then reduce heat and simmer for about 10 minutes.
  4. Add kale, vinegar and soy sauce, stir in. Taste for spices and serve immediately.

Honey Lime Vinaigrette

Fun delicious salad dressing are so good and easy to make you’ll never buy another dressing again!

Ingredients:

  • juice of 2-3 limes, about 1/2 cup
  • 2 tablespoons local honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin
  • dash paprika
  • 1/4 cup olive oil

Instructions:

  1. Mix all ingredients in an air-tight jar, such as mason jar.
  2. Shake vigorously.
  3. Serve over your favorite greens.
  4. Enjoy!
Local History

Local History: African Americans in Covington by Dr. Eva Baham

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“African Americans in Covington” is a collection of stories, memories and photographs covering the history, lives and triumphs of Covington’s African American community. Written by by Dr. Eva Semien Baham with forward by Rev. Mallery Callahan, it was published in 2015 as part of the “Images of America” historical series by Arcadia Publishing. It is available to view and purchase straight from Arcadia Publishing, on Kindle and Amazon, and at local CVS and Walgreens.

excerpt from the book

Book Bio

Covington is the seat of St. Tammany Parish government and sits north of Lake Pontchartrain in the New Orleans metropolitan area. Records from 1727 show 11 Africans on the north shore. One person of African descent was present at the founding of Covington on July 4, 1813. Most African Americans in antebellum Covington were slaves, with a modest number of free people, all of whom covered nearly every occupation needed for the development and sustenance of a heavily forested region. For more than 200 years in Covington, African Americans transformed their second-class status by grounding themselves in shared religious and social values. They organized churches, schools, civic organizations, benevolent societies, athletic associations, and businesses to address their needs and to celebrate their joys.

excerpt from the book

About the Author

Looking back in time, author Eva Semien Baham traces the core of Covington’s African American community members to their faiths’ emphases on timeless endurance, perseverance, and active work for change. Residents have a rich history and a contemporary experience rooted in both spiritual and civic involvement on behalf of the social, cultural, and economic advancement of their community, town, and country.

Dr. Eva Baham is the Assistant Professor of History at Dillard University in New Orleans. Prior to coming to Dillard, she taught for twenty-one years at Southern University, Baton Rouge. Her specialties include American, African-American and Intellectual history. She received her undergraduate degree in journalism from Southern University in Baton Rouge and her Masters of Arts and her Ph.D. in American Studies/History from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. She is the founder of the research organization, université sans murs, l.l.c., translated as University Without Walls, under which she conducts genealogical research projects. At present, those projects involves the Baham, Robert, Kelly, Simien and White families of south Louisiana. Currently, her work involves genealogy, biographical studies and the history of African Americans in Louisiana. – blogtalkradio.com

Local News

St. Tammany Health System Adds Another Autism-Certified Department

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sths

From St. Tammany Health System: St. Tammany Pediatrics Clinic Earns IBCCES Certification as Autism Center

sths

St. Tammany Pediatrics joins St. Tammany Health System pediatric inpatient and emergency departments in earning the Certified Autism Center™ (CAC) designation, granted by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES). STHS pediatricians and clinic staff completed autism-specific training and certification to ensure they can better treat and manage the care of autistic patients or patients with sensory needs.

“We are excited to earn this designation because it gives local families confidence that they can entrust their autistic loved one’s care to us,” Cindy Brandon, St. Tammany Pediatrics office manager, said. “Through this process, we have learned how to interact with our autistic patients from the time we enter their care space. Everything we do and how we do it shows that patient that we can be trusted and are there to help. This is vitally important for autistic patients because they experience interpersonal interactions differently, and we’re grateful to IBCCES for instilling these skills in our team.” 

For more than 20 years, IBCCES has been the industry leader in cognitive disorder training and certification for education, healthcare, and corporate professionals around the globe. IBCCES provides evidence-based training and certification programs created in conjunction with clinical experts and individuals with autism in order to provide professionals serving individuals with cognitive disorders a better understanding of what these disorders are, industry best practices, and the latest research in these areas.

“IBCCES is excited to work with another St. Tammany Health System pediatrics department who has made a commitment to treating and understanding the needs of autistic children,” said Myron Pincomb, IBCCES Board Chairman.

IBCCES also created CertifiedAutismCenter.com, as a free online resource for parents that lists certified locations and professionals. Each organization listed on the site has met Certified Autism Center™ (CAC) requirements.

St. Tammany Pediatrics’ autism certification process was made possible through the generosity of St. Tammany Guild annual giving to St. Tammany Hospital Foundation.

The heartbeat of its community, St. Tammany Health System cares for patients and families with excellence, compassion and teamwork. It is recognized for quality, safety and service excellence by CareChex, Leapfrog, Healthgrades, Hospital Compare, Women’s Choice and US News & World Report. St. Tammany Parish Hospital Service District No. 1 and Ochsner Health work together in partnership to improve the community’s health and quality of life. Together, west St. Tammany’s top two independent health leaders represent the most complete system of care, aligning behind the common goals of improving access, expanding specialty care and making care affordable. Under their agreement, each retains its autonomy; neither manages nor owns the other. Self-supporting, not-for-profit STHS is A+ rated by Fitch and receives no tax funding. More at StTammany.health.

About IBCCES

Delivering The Global Standard For Training and Certification in The Field of Cognitive Disorders – IBCCES provides a series of certifications that empower professionals to be leaders in their field and improve the outcomes for the individuals they serve. These programs recognized around the world as the leading benchmark for training and certification in the areas of autism and other cognitive disorders.

Local Events Non Profit Spotlight

Friends of the Library Hosts Book Sale This Saturday

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Stop by this Saturday February 27th from 9 am – 4 pm for the Friends of the Library Book Sale! Now at their new location, 1301 N Florida St. in Covington near the fairgrounds.

In addition to offering low prices on all items, the FOTL is holding a special buy 2 get 1 free sale of all fiction books. Other selections such as children’s books, hardbacks, CDs and DVDs will also be available. State and Parish COVID mandates will be in force.

The Friends of the Library is a non-profit organization that uses its funds to supplement the Parish Library’s annual budget, purchase equipment, and support projects at the West St. Tammany branches. Books retired from the shelves of the Parish Library system and donated books and media from the community are sold by the non-profit FOTL to the public at low prices.

Learn more here: www.sttammanylibrary.org

Quote & Word of the Week Quote of the Week

Quote of the Week

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“Stand for something or you will fall for anything. Today’s mighty oak is yesterday’s nut that held its ground.” – Rosa Parks

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an American activist in the civil rights movement best known for her pivotal role in the Montgomery bus boycott. The United States Congress has called her “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement”.

Rosa Parks seated toward the front of the bus, Montgomery, Alabama, 1956. (Photo by Underwood Archives/Getty Images)

On December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, Parks rejected bus driver James F. Blake’s order to vacate a row of four seats in the “colored” section in favor of a white passenger, once the “white” section was filled. Parks wasn’t the first person to resist bus segregation, but the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) believed that she was the best candidate for seeing through a court challenge after her arrest for civil disobedience in violating Alabama segregation laws, and she helped inspire the black community to boycott the Montgomery buses for over a year. The case became bogged down in the state courts, but the federal Montgomery bus lawsuit Browder v. Gayle resulted in a November 1956 decision that bus segregation is unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Read more at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_Parks

Pet of the Week

NHS Adoptable Pet of the Week

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Northshore Humane Society‘s adoptable pet of the week:

Venus

Venus and her three pups (Jupiter, Pluto and Mars) were part of a larger group of animals transferred to Northshore Humane Society from a municipal shelter who was out of space and out of time. Her pups were all quickly adopted while Venus kept searching. Now, four months later and finished with her heartworm treatment, it’s time this girl finally finds her second chance and a family to call her own!

Venus is an absolute lovebug who adores human attention and giving hugs. At only one year of age, she’s also playful too! She’s going to make a great family pup or companion for someone out there!

If you are interested in Venus or any of the other adoptable animals of Northshore Humane Society, please email rescue@nshumane.org